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May 23, 6:00pm at the District Architecture Center

 

Join the Mexican Cultural Institute and the District Architecture Center for a lecture on affordable housing by Architect Tatiana Bilbao.

In Mexico, the housing stock numbers over 30 million, but with a population of 120 million and one of the fastest growth rates in Latin America, the housing shortage constitutes a total of 9 million homes. Much of the new additions to the housing stock are informally built with poor quality and, more importantly, lack basic access to urban services or a community. This is an unsustainable condition. During this lecture, award-winning Mexican architect Tatiana Bilbao will explore case studies that, through a rigorous investigation of the social and economic landscapes, have sought to provide low-cost solutions of high spatial quality that can be deployed with a meaningful positive impact.

Photo credit: Jaime Navarro, 2016

SOLD OUT

More info here




District Architecture Center
421 7th Street NW
Washington, DC 20004
May 23, 2017




May 18, 6:45pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

Join the Mexican Cultural Institute and FD13 as they present artist Adriana Lara for a night of dialogue, lecture, and artistic performance at the Club of Interesting Theories

An ongoing project that intertwines the visual and theoretical, the Club of Interesting Theories develops a proposal for the potential visualization of the processes of theory-making and thought-production, this time with a focus on U.S.-Mexico relations.

At the public event, a series of projected graphics from Lara's visual system will be in dialogue with readings of a few selected interesting crowd-sourced theories along with a site-specific installation that will unfold as the evening advances.

The Club opens the opportunity to present and discuss relevant theoretical works as well as Mexico in general, alongside an artistic counterpart that attempts to integrate thought into the reading of an artwork.

Adriana Lara examines the instability of meaning, the structures and patterns, in which content and form merge, reflect on each other, and dissolve. Through this line of exploration Lara's practice takes on many different formats and shapes as she experiments with different contexts with an open-ended, non-academic approach. Under the collective Perros Negros, she continues to curate exhibitions; she also been editing the fanzine Pazmaker since 2006.

Lara's project is co-initiated by Sandra Teitge and is co-organized with FD13 residency for the arts and the Mexican Cultural Institute of the Embassy of Mexico to the US.

RSVP to rsvp@instituteofmexicodc.org.




Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
May 18, 2017




May 9, 6:45pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

Join the Mexican Cultural Institute as it presents Archaeologist Ximena Chávez Balderas for a lecture on the exotic animals disinterred at the Tenochtitlan archaeological site.

Since 1978, the Templo Mayor Project has discovered a biological treasure with no precedents in Mesoamerica. The remains of thousands of organisms - sponges, echinoderms, corals, mollusks, arthropods, fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals - have been found in 165 offerings discovered in the archaeological site.

In this lecture, Chávez Balderas will address the extraordinary biological diversity found in the ritual deposits of the Great Temple, as well as the history of archaeological findings at the site. She will present recent discoveries found in the last five years and how they contribute to the understanding of captivity, animal symbolism, sacrifice and ritual use.

Ximena Chávez Balderas is a bioarchaeologist at the Templo Mayor Project. She is specialized in funerary archaeology, sacrificial practices, mortuary treatments and archaeozoology. She earned her BA from the Escuela Nacional de Antropología e Historia. Her MPhil was awarded by the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México and her MA by Tulane University. She is a PhD candidate at Tulane University, was the main curator of the Templo Mayor Museum between 2001 and 2007, and is currently a Junior Fellow at Dumbarton Oaks.

RSVP here or write an email to rsvp@instituteofmexicodc.org




Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
May 9, 2017




April 19, 6:45pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

Join the Mexican Cultural Institute for a talk on opera without boundaries with Mexican-Born Composers Carlos Sánchez-Gutiérrez and Ricardo Zohn-Muldoon. The two will show video excerpts and discuss the genesis and realization of "Don't Blame Anyone/No se culpe a nadie," their recent stage work involving music, physical theatre, and puppetry, in collaboration with US and Mexico-based artists BrandBand Ensemble, PUSH Physical Theatre and La Coperacha. The work is based on the graphic imagery of noted Mexican cartoonist Jis, and explores, through a series of interconnected vignettes, the elusive encounter between imagination and creativity, the terror experienced before the blank page, the battle against the demons of Reason, and the unpredictable visit of the muses.

More info here.

RSVP here.





Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
April 19, 2017




April 4, 6:45pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

Join the Mexican Cultural Institute, in collaboration with SPAIN arts & culture, for a discussion with Mexican Architect Edgar González. The boundaries between the digital and physical realm have been dissolving more and more. Today we live a hybrid reality composed of new layers of information that we produce, consume, interact with and inhabit. This talk, "The maps we live in," will walk us trough a journey across the new geographies we currently populate.

Edgar González is a Mexican architect based in Madrid. He directs the Bachelor in Design at the IE School of Architecture and Design. He is also the principal of EGD (Edgar González Design), a Strategic Design Agency where he practices as a strategic consultant specialised in applying design processes to complex problems and narratives.

RSVP here.





Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
April 4, 2017




Thursday March 16, 2017, 7:00pm at President Lincoln's Cottage

 

Join President Lincoln's Cottage and the Mexican Cultural Institute for a timely conversation as Dr. Jason Silverman and Alberto Fierro-Garza take a close look at international relations and historic ties between the United States and Mexico. The conversation will be based around Dr. Silverman's article, A Most Unlikely Friendship: Abraham Lincoln and Matías Romero.

Lincoln's close relationship with Matías Romero, a Mexican politician and diplomat who served three times as Secretary of Finance and twice as ambassador of Mexico to the United States during the 19th century, was not only an unusual display of diplomacy, but also friendship.

This program is free and open to the public, but space is limited. Register to attend here.





President Lincoln's Cottage
140 Rock Creek Church Road NW
Washington, DC 200011
Thursday March 16, 2017, 7:00pm




Friday March 3, 2017, 7:00pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

Washington Performing Arts' Mars Urban Arts Initiative, in partnership with the Mexican Cultural Institute, will host a panel discussion featuring Kronos Quartet violinist David Harrington (at left), moderated by James Early. The panel will also feature Cynthia Vidaurri (Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, Huda Assfour (musician), and Jim Thomson (Multiflora Productions) as well as local artists, diplomats, arts administrators, and culture bearers.

The panel, titled "How Do We Value and Sustain Cultural Identities Without Stereotypes?: An Urgent Question of Cultural Democracy In Today's World" will tap the experiences of the panelist to explore artistic production across cultures.

The following day, March 4, Kronos Quartet will perform at Sixth & I Historic Synagogue. Tickets can be found here.

RSVP here





Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
March 3, 2017, 7:00pm



Friday February 24, 2017, 6:00pm at Upshur Street Books

 

The Alan Cheuse International Writers Center, the Mexican Cultural Institute, and Upshur Street Books present Juan Pablo Villalobos! Don't miss a reading and discussion of "I'll Sell You a Dog," the most recent book in English by the celebrated Mexican novelist.

Juan Pablo Villalobos' first novel, Down the Rabbit Hole, was the first translation to be shortlisted for the Guardian First Book Award (in 2011). He writes regularly for publications including Granta and translated Rodrigo de Souza Leão's novel All Dogs are Blue (also published by And Other Stories) into Spanish. In 2016 he was awarded the 34th Premio Herralde de Novela for his book "No voy a pedirle a nadie que me crea." His work has been translated into fifteen languages. He lives in Barcelona and has two children.





827 Upshur St NW
Washington, DC 20011
February 24, 6:00pm
Free Admission



December 15, 2016, 6:45pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

Join the Mexican Cultural Institute for a lecture with Philadelphia Museum of Art Curator, Matthew Affron. Affron will discuss Modern Art and Mexico and the Philadelphia Museum of Art's current exhibit on Mexican Modernism Paint the Revolution.

Matthew Affron is the Muriel and Philip Berman Curator of Modern Art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. His essays have appeared in exhibitions about cubism, abstract art, and modern art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art, the Musée des Beaux-Arts de Lyon, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and other institutions. He is a co-curator of Paint the Revolution: Mexican Modernism, 1910-1950, an exhibition that is currently on view at the Philadelphia Museum of Art and which will travel to the Museo del Palacio de Bellas Artes, Mexico City, in February 2017.

RSVP to the discussion at the MCI here



Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
December 15, 6:45pm




November 30, 2016, 6:45pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

Join the Mexican Cultural Institute for an evening with Juan Villoro. Villoro's lecture at the Institute, El vértigo horizontal: Un recuento narrativo de la Ciudad de México, will be held in Spanish. The University of Maryland will also host a number of other events, held in English and Spanish, to honor this important author as part of the José Emilio Pacheco Distinguished Lecture Series.

Juan Villoro (b. 1956, Mexico City) is a novelist, short-story writer, essayist, and chronicler whose work addresses an impressive array of topics with insight, dark humor, and irony: canonical Mexican literature; the Zapatista insurrection in Chiapas; the legacy of Mexico's Cristero War; the intersections of popular television and fiction genres; and the social and cultural functions of spectator sports like boxing and soccer. He is one of Mexico's most important living authors and a world-renowned public intellectual.

RSVP to the discussion at the MCI here

More info on the December 2nd UMD event can be found here




Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
November 30, 6:45pm




November 3, 2016, 6:45pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

Join the Mexican Cultural Institute for a tribute to famous Mexican dancer and choreographer, Gloria Contreras. The tribute will be led by Contreras's son, Gregorio Luke, and will include a lecture and discussion of Contreras's work and legacy. The lecture is presented in conjunction with The Washington School of Ballet's homage to Gloria Contreras, taking place November 5 & 6 at the Washington School of Ballet.

Gloria Contreras (1934-2015) fused universal ballet with historical Mexican dances for a new definition of modern Mexico. A disciple of Nelsy D'Ambre and George Balanchine she created over 250 ballets, which were presented in the U.S., Russia, Europe and Latin America by companies such as the New York City Ballet, the Joffery Ballet, the Ballet Nacional de Cuba and The Royal Winnipeg Ballet among others. In 1970 Contreras founded the Taller Coreográfico de la UNAM, one of Mexico' most vibrant contemporary ballet companies which she directed for 45 years.

Gregorio Luke is the former Deputy Director of the Mexican Cultural Institute in Washington D.C., Cultural Attaché of Mexico in Los Angeles and Director of the Museum of Latin American Art MoLAA in Long Beach, CA. A Smithsonian scholar, Mr. Luke is an expert in Mexican and Latin American art. He has presented over 1,000 lectures in institutions such as The Library of Congress, the Detroit Institute of Art, Harvard, and many others.

RSVP to the talk here

Learn about the dance performance here






Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
November 3, 2016, 6:45pm




October 27, 2016, 6:00pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

As part of the Robert A. Pastor North American Research Initiative, the Mexican Cultural Institute, the American University Center for Latin American and Latino Studies (CLALS), and the School of International Service will host a panel of emerging scholars to discuss the new agenda for North American integration. This public panel will showcase five international emerging scholars and their work on North American integration, including themes such as migration, populism, the environment, and governance in Canada, the United States, and Mexico. The panel will be introduced by CLALS Director Eric Hershberg and the Executive Director of the Mexican Cultural Institute, Alberto Fierro.

Panelists will include Tom Long, Lecturer in International Relations at the University of Reading (United Kingdom); Christopher Wilson, Deputy Director of the Mexico Institute at the Wilson Center; Malcolm Fairbrother, Associate Professor in Global Policy and Politics at the University of Bristol (United Kingdom); Alexandra Délano, Assistant Professor of Global Studies at The New School (New York City); and Marcela López Vallejo Olvera, Associate Professor at Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas (Mexico).

RSVP here






Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
October 27, 6:00pm




Wednesday, October 26, 2016, 5:30pm at American University

 

Join the Mexican Cultural Institute and its close collaborator, The American University Center for Latin American & Latino Studies, as it hosts a discussion with Margo Glantz as part of the Cátedra Cultura de México program. An acclaimed writer, essayist, scholar, and literary critic, Margo Glantz has become a definitive voice in the world of Mexican literature for nearly 7 decades.

Known for critical analyses of Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz and other Mexican colonial figures, Glantz also explores her personal history through autobiography, fiction, and testimony. Please join Glantz and a panel of AU scholars and others for a rare opportunity to engage in conversation about the author's life and universally-celebrated work.

RSVP here


American University
Letts Formal Lounge
4400 Massachusetts Ave NW
Washington, DC 20016
Wednesday October 26, 2016




Tuesday, October 25, 2016, 6:45pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

Join the Mexican Cultural Institute for a talk on branding for and marketing to the Hispanic market presented by esteemed Creative Director Luis Fitch.

Founder and Creative Director of UNO Branding, Luis Fitch has lead award-winning branding efforts for top 500 fortune companies including: Target Corp., Nike, Macy's, General Mills and MTV Latino. His work has been awarded by the prestigious McKnight Fellowships for Visual Artists and his prevalent work is profiled in international design and marketing publications around the world.

His presentation will focus on demystifying and designing for the U.S. Hispanic consumer. Attendees will see how Luis's UNO Branding designs for retail, promotions, and product development, utilizing the consumer profiling process.

As part of the event, visitors will be able to see Fitch's proposal for a concept design of a day of the dead altar that will be installed at the Mexican Cultural Institute.

RSVP here


Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
Tuesday, October 25, 2016



October 14, 2016 at 6:00pm at the Textile Museum

 

The state of Oaxaca in southern Mexico is home to dozens of indigenous communities, each with a distinctive textile tradition. Today, this rich cultural heritage is at a crossroads, as commercially manufactured goods replace traditional techniques. Join American photographer Eric Mindling for an in-depth look at his Living Threads Project. Living Threads documents the fragile diversity of Oaxacan textiles, and the people who use them, through contemporary portraiture.


Tickets & more info here




The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum
701 21st Street, NW
Washington DC
October 14, 2016 at 6:00pm



An Homage to Artemio Posadas

September 29, 2016, 6:30pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

Join the Mexican Cultural Institute to honor Artemio Posadas for being named a National Endowment for the Arts National Heritage Fellow and 2016 Bess Lomax Hawes Award recipient.

Artemio Posadas is a musician, dancer, teacher, and tireless cultural organizer, and this year's Bess Lomax Hawes National Heritage Fellow for his commitment to the Mexican tradition of son huasteco.

For the past 34 years, the National Endowment for the Arts has honored the US's master folk and traditional artists with the National Heritage Fellowship. This lifetime achievement award recognizes the ways these individuals demonstrate and reflect the US's living cultural heritage and the efforts of these artists to share their knowledge with the next generation.

In addition to the celebration at the MCI, the NEA will celebrate the 2016 National Heritage Fellow in Washington, DC, at an awards ceremony at the Library of Congress on Wednesday, September 28, 2016 at 5:30pm and a free concert on Friday, September 30, 2016 at 8:00 p.m. at George Washington University's Lisner Auditorium. Both events are free and open to the public.

RSVP to the MCI event here


More info here


Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th St NW
Washington DC, 20009
Free Admission



Tatiana Flores on the Making of Modern Mexican Art

Wednesday, August 31, 2016, 6:45pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

The Mexican Cultural Institute is proud to host art historian Tatiana Flores for a lecture titled From Social to Artistic Revolution: The Making of Modern Mexican Art.

Her talk will include findings from her book Mexico's Revolutionary Avant-Gardes: From Estridentismo to ¡30-30!. A revisionist and interdisciplinary account of Mexican modern art as seen through two avant-garde movements, the book received the 2014 Humanities Book Prize awarded by the Mexico Section of the Latin American Studies Association. It was also runner-up for the Photography/Art category at the Southern California Book Festival and the Los Angeles Book Festival in 2013.

Tatiana Flores (Ph.D., Columbia University) is Associate Professor in the Department of Art History at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, with a joint appointment in the Department of Latino and Caribbean Studies. A specialist in modern and contemporary Latin American art, she is active as an independent curator and art critic, as well as an author.

RSVP here


2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
August 31, 2016


Mexican-American scholar Davíd Carrasco on Mapping Mexico before the Spaniards

Thursday June 2, 2016, 6:45 pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

Join the Mexican Cultural Institute as it hosts scholar and Aguila Azteca recipient Davíd Carrasco for the Keynote speech of the The Omohundro Institute's Translation and Transmission in the Early Americas: Fourth Early Americanist 'Summit'.

Davíd Carrasco (Harvard University) will present his recent research on the "Mapa de Cuauhtinchan número 2." Although the map itself was produced in the post-conquest era,it provides a rich and beautifully worked pictographic account of Chichimeca migrations before the arrival of the Spaniards. With its multiple temporal frames, blend of creation narratives, and scenes of daily life, as well as vivid images of movement, migration, and the passing of time, it offers unique insights into pre-Hispanic and early-colonial literacies, literatures, and histories. This talk is presented in collaboration with the Omohundro Institute and the Kislak Foundation.

Following more than a decade of conferences dedicated to the study of the colonial Americas, Translation and Transmission in the Early Americas: Fourth Early Americanist 'Summit' brings together scholars who study translation from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, including history, art history, anthropology, linguistics, and literary studies in multiple languages. The conference features 40 panels dedicated to a broad range of topics -- from indigenous soundscapes and Nahuatl in New Spain to the translation of religious, scientific, and political treatises.

RSVP here


2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
Thursday June 2, 2016
6:45 pm
Free Admission


Discover the MCI with Pam Scott

April 13, 2016, 3:30 pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

Architecture Week is a series of public events that celebrate architecture in the nation's capital. With this 16th celebration, Architecture Week will shine a spotlight on Washington's foreign embassies and institutions, including our own Mexican Cultural Institute. Join us at 3:30 pm on Wednesday, April 13th for a lecture on the 16th Street Mansion, highlighting the several distinctive features designed by architect Nathan Wyeth, including the Entrance Hall, distinguished by an elaborately carved staircase that leads to the upper floors; the Music Room and the pipes of the Aeolian organ on the north wall, which were installed from the basement to the fourth floor; and the Dining Room, for many years the largest private one in all of DC.

The lecture will be given by the esteemed architectural historian Pamela Scott, who specializes in the history of Washington's planning and built environment. She has taught the History of Washington Architecture at several universities and curated exhibits for the Library of Congress, National Building Museum, Capitol Historical Society, Historical Society of Washington, and Department of Interior Museum on topics from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries relating to Washington's history.

Scott lectures frequently on many aspects of Washington's public buildings and their symbolism at scholarly meetings and at museums and historical societies. She has received fellowships from Winterthur Museum, the U.S. Capitol Historical Society, and the White House Historical Association/Organization of American Historians. Her most recent book, Fortress of Finance (2010), tied for second place in the Independent Publishers of Books award for the mid-Atlantic, non-fiction book. A tour will follow the lecture.

RSVP here


Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th st NW
Washington DC, 20009
April 13, 3:30 pm
Free Admission


Dr. Barbara Tenenbaum

November 19, 2015, 6:45pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

In this illustrated talk, Dr. Barbara Tenenbaum, Specialist in Mexican Culture in the Hispanic Division of the Library of Congress, will discuss the nature of the Mexican Revolution and its influence on the world. Dr. Tenenbaum will explore how this first lasting Revolution of the twentieth century had impacted not only on Mexico, but the global political landscape at large.

Barbara A. Tenenbaum received her Ph.D. at Harvard University where she studied under John Womack, Jr. She has taught at Vassar College, the University of South Carolina, and Howard and Catholic Universities. She joined the Library of Congress as Specialist in Mexican Culture in 1992.

To RSVP, click here



Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th St NW
Washington DC, 20009
November 19, 6:45pm


Álvaro Enrigue previews English translation of his book Muerte Súbita

November 16, 2015, 6:45pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

The Mexican Cultural Institute is proud to host Mexican author Álvaro Enrigue as he previews the English translation of his book Muerte Súbita (Sudden Death) in a dialogue with Marie Arana from the Library of Congress.

A daring, kaleidoscopic novel about the clash of empires and ideas in the sixteenth century that continue to reverberate throughout modernity, Sudden Death is a story unlike anything you've ever read before and was the 2013 winner of the Herralde award.

Álvaro Enrigue other works include the novel La muerte de un instalador which won him the Joaquin Moritz prize in 1996. He currently teaches at Princeton and Columbia Universities in addition to collaborating with publications like The New York Times, The Believer and The London Review of Books.

Marie Arana is a Peruvian-American author of both nonfiction and fiction, Senior Advisor to the U.S. Librarian of Congress, director of the National Book Festival, and a Writer at Large for the Washington Post. For many years, she was editor-in-chief of the Washington Post's literary section, Book World and she has also written for the New York Times and National Geographic, among many other publications.

To RSVP, click here



Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th St NW
Washington DC, 20009
November 16, 6:45pm


Mexican director Guita Schyfter at American University

October 28, 2015, 6:00pm at American University

 

Through its partnership with American University's Center for Latin American and Latino Studies, the Mexican Cultural Institute welcomes Mexican film director Guita Schyfter. In a panel discussion with American University professors, Schyfter will discuss Mexican cinema, her films Las caras de la luna and Huérfanos, and will take questions from the audience.





More info



American University
Hughes Formal Lounge
4400 Massachusetts Ave NW
Washington DC, 20016
October 28th, 6:00pm


Pedro Lasch and co-authors present the book What are we before we are naturalized?

October 27, 2015, 6:45pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

The Mexican Cultural Institute is proud to host Pedro Lasch and co-authors Don Russell (Provisions Library), Taína Caragol (National Portrait Gallery), Kristy Maruca Esparza (Hirshhorn Museum & D.C. Public Schools), and Molly Donovan (National Gallery of Art) as they present the book What are we before we are naturalized? Portraiture, Citizenship, and Abstraction. The illustrated bilingual publication catalogs twelve years of archival materials from Pedro Lasch's Naturalizations series (2002-15) and presents new works created during the artist's Provisions research residency in Washington, D.C. (2013-14).

Consisting of the production and distribution of various kinds of rectangular mirror masks, all to be used in specific social situations, the process and title of the series also invites participants to constantly question the "natural" and those institutions-religious, mythological, or governmental-that claim not only to know what is "natural" but are even ready to issue their own stamps of "naturalization". Over the years, the series has included interventions in public spaces, schools, grassroots settings, university seminars, publications, and museum installations, as well as artworks in traditional media such as photography, painting, sculpture, dance, and theater. Taking place in many cities and countries around the world, Naturalizations projects have included hundreds of participants and dozens of partnering institutions.

Pedro Lasch was born and raised in Mexico City. He divides his time between North Carolina, where he teaches Art, Art History and Visual Studies at Duke University (since 2002), and New York, where he leads ongoing projects with immigrant communities and art collectives.

More info

To RSVP, click here



Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th St NW
Washington DC, 20009
October 27th, 6:45pm


Anya Montiel on William Spratling's Alaska Project

October 13, 2015, 6:45pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

The Mexican Cultural Institute is proud to present Anya Montiel as she lectures on William Spratling's Alaska Project in conjunction with the MCI's exhibit Silver on Silver.

In 1945 the U.S. Department of the Interior contracted William Spratling to develop a silver workshop for indigenous Alaskans. Working from his Taxco apprenticeship model, Spratling proposed a six-month training program in Mexico and by October 1948, seven Inuits had arrived in Taxco to learn from Mexican master silversmiths. What followed is an amazing and little-known story about craftsmanship bringing people together in the post-World War II era.

Anya Montiel is a PhD candidate at Yale University and a curatorial fellow at the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI). Her dissertation investigates the policies of the Indian Arts and Crafts Board, a federal agency created in 1935 to promote Native American art. She received a bachelor's degree in anthropology and Native American Studies from the University of California at Davis and a master's degree in museum studies from John F. Kennedy University. Anya has worked in the museum field for more than ten years and has been a writer for the Smithsonian's American Indian magazine since 2002 where she writes about contemporary Native life and art.

RSVP here



Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th St NW
Washington DC, 20009
October 13, 6:45pm


César Villanueva discusses new Mexican cultural diplomacy

September 24, 2015, 6:45pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

The Mexican Cultural Institute is proud to present César Villanueva as he discusses new Mexican cultural diplomacy. Villanueva will present some of the works from his book Una nueva diplomacia cultural para México/New Mexican Cultural Diplomacy, a compilation of texts from diplomats and cultural experts. He will also engage in a dialogue with Alejandro Estivill on international relations and cultural diplomacy as they relate to Mexico.

César Villanueva R. is Associate Professor of International Relations and Public/Cultural Diplomacy at Universidad Iberoamericana in Mexico City. He was the guest editor of the Mexican Journal of Foreign Policy, 2008 and 2012 where he explored the topics of public and cultural diplomacy, and the image of Mexico abroad. He published Representing Cultural Diplomacy (VXU Press, 2007 Sweden), and has just now published the edited volume A Contemporary Agenda for Mexican Cultural Diplomacy (UIA Press, 2014, Mexico), a breakthrough analysis of trends and actions of soft power in Mexico in the recent decade. He has a PhD in Political Science from Linnéuniversitetet (Växjö University), in Sweden. He carried out Post-Doctoral studies at New York University (2012). He is a frequent lecturer on cultural/public diplomacy, and contemporary arts at different Universities and Cultural Centers in the Americas and Europe, such as the University of Southern California (USC), University of Gothenburg (UGOT), the National Center of the Arts (CENART) and the Diplomatic Academy from the Foreign Ministry (SRE) in Mexico City. Recently, he has been a Guest Speaker at the Wilton Park conference on Soft Power, Cantalagua Mexico 2014, The Image of Denmark Abroad Research Group, University of Copenhagen 2015, The Public Diplomacy Dialogue, at the Annenberg School of Communication, and the University of Southern California (2015). In the fall of 2015 he will present a report on the Image of Mexico Abroad (2006-2014) under the auspices of CONACyT.

Read more



To RSVP, click here



2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
September 24, 6:45pm


The Origins of the Mexican Flag by Dr. Enrique Florescano

September 10, 2015, 6:45pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

Considered one of the leading innovators of historical research, Dr. Enrique Florescano is a Mexican historian who has authored several books and articles on Mexican history, focusing on prehispanic culture, social and economic history, national identity, and more. His lecture will focus on the history and origins of the Mexican flag.

Dr. Florescano studied law and history at the Universidad Veracruzana and received his MA in universal history at the Colegio de Mexico and his doctorate in history at the École Pratique des Hautes Etudes of the University of Paris (Sorbonne).

Since 1989 he has served as the national coordinator of Historical Projects of the National Council for Culture and the Arts, among many other positions. He is a researcher emeritus member of the National System of Researchers and in 1996 he received the highest award granted by the Mexican government: the National Prize for Arts and Sciences, in the areas of History, Philosophy and Social Sciences.

This event will be held in Spanish



To RSVP, click here



2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
September 10, 6:45pm


Penny Morrill on William Spratling

September 9, 2015, 6:45 pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

In conjunction with the exhibit Silver on Silver the MCI presents Penny Morrill lecturing on the life of William Spratling. Penny Morrill is an accomplished academic in the world of Mesoamerican art history and an expert on the life and work of William Spratling.

She has authored and edited several books on the Mexican silver industry and Spratling's role in it, including William Spratling and the Mexican Silver Renaissance: Maestros de Plata and Mexican Silver: 20th Century Handwrought Jewelry and Decorative Objects. She has lectured throughout North America and Europe and has published numerous academic pieces on Mesoamerican art history.

Penny Morrill holds an M.A. in Pre-Columbian Mesoamerican Art from the University of Pennsylvania and a Ph.D. in Mesoamerican Colonial Art History from the University of Maryland. She is a Member and Chair of the Association of Latin American Art Book Award Committee and the founder of the Spratling-Taxco Collection at the Latin-American Library at Tulane University.

Don't miss the opportunity to hear this expert lecture on the life and work of the enigmatic William Spratling.

More info

RSVP here



2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
September 9, 6:45 pm
Free Admission


Prefessor Elizabeth Boone

April 9, 2015, 6:45 pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

The Mexican Cultural Institute in collaboration with the University of Maryland and George Washington University is proud to present The Dilemma of the Gods and the Familiarity of the Kings: Constructions of Aztec Identity in Early Colonial Mexico, a talk by Elizabeth Boone (Tulane University). The talk will put into dialogue Bernardino de Sahagún's and other chroniclers' images of the Aztec gods and the Aztec kings to show how the ancient deities were constructed from an array of discursive practices, whereas the lords easily remained within their Preconquest frame.

The Dilemma of the Gods and the Familiarity of the Kings: Constructions of Aztec Identity in Early Colonial Mexico is part of the inter-disciplinary symposium Entangled trajectories: integrating Native American and European histories, which will explore how the encounters between European and Amerindian cultures after 1492 contributed to the first age of globalization. Unlike many histories that cast Native Americans and Native cultures primarily as passive victims of colonizers' actions and ideas, this event investigates the role of native actors in the creation of the modern world in both hemispheres. Thirteen invited scholars prominent in their fields will present their cutting-edge research on the shared histories of Native America and early modern Europe from multiple disciplinary perspectives, including those of history, art history, literature, cultural anthropology, and philosophy.


More info

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Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
April 9, 6:45 pm


The National Museum of Anthropology Commemorates 50 years

March 19, 2015, 6:45 pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

Join the Mexican Cultural Institute as it commemorates the 50th anniversary of the National Museum of Anthropology! This event will feature a presentation of the book published in the museum's honor. Presenting will be the book's editor Carla Zarebska and the director of the Museo Nacional de Antropología, Dr. Antonio Saborit, along with other distinguished scholars.

The stories that the book holds are those of the collections, spaces and people whose lives are fused with the genesis of the MNA. Featuring not only the fantastic history of the museum's emblematic architecture and collections, the book also discusses the vision of the architects, engineers, and curators that made the museum a reality. Honoring the little recognized work of those who took great pains to preserve the legacy of Mexico's cultural heritage, this book not only honors the museum's history, but makes a place for itself in the museum's legacy.

RSVP here






2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
March 19, 6:45pm


Poetics of Wonder:Passage to Mogador with Alberto Ruy Sánchez and Rhonda Dahl Buchanan

March 17, 2015, 6:45pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

The Mexican Cultural Institute is proud to again present the author Alberto Ruy Sánchez as he presents his newest book Nueve veces el asombro. Acompanied by the work's translator, Rhonda Dahl Buchanan, Ruy Sánchez will present and explore his work in a bilingual dialogue.

In 1975 Alberto Ruy Sánchez visited Essaouira, a walled city on the Atlantic coast of Africa whose ancient name was Mogador. Shortly after his first trip to Morocco, Ruy Sanchez began to erect the city of Mogador, first in his imagination and then in the narrative space of five works that explore the paradoxical nature of desire with the four elements as unifying emblems: Los nombres del aire (1987), En los labios del agua (1996), Los jardines secretos de Mogador (2001), and La mano del fuego (2007). Like the last finger of the hamsa, a fifth book, Nueve veces el asombro: Nueve veces nueve las cosas que dicen de Mogador (Mexico: Alfaguara, 2005) accompanies the four novels, offering the reader "poetics of wonder," a compendium of 81 chapters Mogador. In 2014,the five works were united in one volume called Quinteto de Mogador (Quintet of Mogador), and although Nueve veces el asombro appeared as the fourth book of the series, Ruy Sánchez placed it before the other novels because he considered it to be the inspiration for the entire collection. Please join us for an evening of conversation with Alberto Ruy Sánchez and his translator, Rhonda Dahl Buchanan, who will provide "Sketches of Mogador" in an animated conversation about the author's work, with a selection of bilingual readings from Poetics of Wonder: Passage to Mogador.


Alberto Ruy Sánchez is a Mexican writer and editor. Born in 1951, he is the author of tewnty-three books of fiction, non-fiction and poetry translated to fifteen languages who received his Ph.D. from The University of Paris. His novel Mogador, published by City Lights in San Francisco in 1993, was awarded the Xavier Villaurrutia Prize, the most prestigious litterary recognition in Mexico. The University of New Mexico awarded him as Litterary essayist in 1991 an he was also a Fellow of the J.S. Guggenheim Foundation. Since 1988 he has been the Chief Editor and founding publisher of Latin America's leading Arts Magazine: Artes de Mexico.

Rhonda Dahl Buchanan is a Professor of Spanish and Director of Latin American and Latino Studies at the University of Louisville. In 2006 she was awarded a National Endowment for the Arts Literature Fellowship to translate Alberto Ruy-Sánchez's novel Los jardines secretos de Mogador: voces de la tierra. Her translation, The Entre Ríos Trilogy: Three Novels by the Argentine writer Perla Suez was published in 2006 by The University of New Mexico Press in their Jewish Latin America Series. In 2008, White Pine Press published her translation, Quick Fix: Sudden Fiction, a bilingual illustrated anthology of short short stories by the Argentine writer Ana María Shua, followed by The Secret Gardens of Mogador: Voices of the Earth in 2009.

More Info


RSVP here





Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th Street NW DC
Washington, DC 20009
March 17, 6:45 pm


Latinos in the Washington Metro Area

February 26, 2015, 6:45 pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

Join historian Jorge Hernandez-Fujigaki as he presents Latinos in the Washington Metro Area, a pictorial book that offers a glimpse into the rich history and culture of the Washington DC area's Latino community. Comprised of photos taken mostly before the advent of digital photography the photos uncover the stories of prominent businessmen, politicians, educators, and artists, as well as the largely invisible lives of ordinary Latinos working in offices, barber shops, grocery stores, restaurants, hotels, and more - all critical contributors to the engine that powers this unique region.

Co-authored by anthropologist Maria Sprehn-Malagón, PhD, historian Jorge Hernandez-Fujigaki, PhD, and college counselor Linda Robinson, Latinos in the Washington Metro Area features pictures collected from family albums, local photographers' collections, scholars' archives, newspapers, and the Library of Congress.

RSVP here






2829 16th Street NW DC
Washington, DC 20009
February 26, 6:45 pm


A Tribute to the Life of José Emilio Pacheco

February 17, 2015, 6:45 pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

The University of Maryland's Department of Spanish and Portuguese and the School of Languages Literatures and Cultures, in collaboration with the Mexican Cultural Institute, are proud to present A Tribute to José Emilio Pacheco. This tribute will honor the lauded Mexican writer José Emilio Pacheco (2009 Cervantes Award Winner) a year after his death with discussion and readings. The event will feature special guest, Cristina Pacheco, prominent Mexican journalist and Pacheco's wife. Also in attendance will be scholars Saúl Sosnowski and Hernán Sánchez Martínez de Pinillos. Join us at this celebration of José Emilio Pacheco's extraordinary life and work. The Fondo de Cultura Economica will have works by José Emilio Pacheco and Cristina Pacheco available at the tribute.

El Departamento de Español y Portugués y la Escuela de Literatura y Culturas de la Universidad de Maryland, en colaboración con el Instituto Cultural de México, se enorgullecen en presentar Un homenaje a José Emilio Pacheco. Este diálogo y lectura de la obra de Pacheco honrará la memoria del galardonado escritor mexicano (Premio Cervantes 2009) a un año de su fallecimiento. En el evento participará como invitada especial Cristina Pacheco, destacada periodista mexicana y esposa del escritor, así como los acádemicos expertos en literatura hispana Saúl Sosnowski y Hernán Sánchez Martínez de Pinillos. ¡Acompáñenos en esta celebración a la vida y obra de José Emilio Pacheco! El Fondo de Cultura Económica tendrá a su disposición títulos de la obra literaria de José Emilio Pacheco y de la periodista Cristina Pacheco.

More info

This event will be held in Spanish

RSVP here






Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
February 17, 6:45 pm


"Path of Knowledge" by Alejandro Pintado

November 20, 2014, 6:45 pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

Artist Alejandro Pintado will present his book Path of Knowledge based on his exhibit of the same name. The exhibit is a mixed-medium exploration of geometry, perspective, and composition. Pintado will engage in an artistic dialogue with Vesela Sretenovic, Senior Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at The Phillips Collection.

RSVP here





2829 16th Street NW DC
Washington, DC 20009
November 20, 6:45 pm
Free Admission


A Conversation with Gabriel Figueroa Flores

September 10, 2014, 6:45 pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

The Embassy of Mexico and The Televisa Foundation, in conjunction with the Mexican Cultural Institute, will present a number of events in conjunction with the exposition Gabriel Figueroa: Cinematographer: Great Moments in Mexico's Golden Age of Cinema.

Gabriel Figueroa's Life's Work: A Conversation with Gabriel Figueroa Flores | September 10th, 6:45 pm
Gabriel Figueroa Flores (1952) is a Mexican photographer and son of the director and cinematographer Gabriel Figueroa Mateos. He decided to dedicate himself to professional photography after taking a course on the work of Ansel Adams and studied art and photography in London under the guidance of such professors as Manuel Álvarez Bravo, Arnold Newman and Eikoh Hosoe.

He currently works to maintain and restore his father's work. He has published a number of books including "Sinaloa" (1986), "Archipiélago Revillagigedo. La Última Frontera" (1988), "Arquitectura Fantástica Mexicana" (1991,) "Lugares prometidos" (2006) and "Arenas Nomadas" (2012). Landscapes are a significant theme among his photographic work, which has been displayed in expositions all over the world.




Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
Free Admission
To RSVP click here


Centennial of three Mexican Literary Legends

August 30, 2014, 6:00 pm as part of the National Book Festival

 

The Library of Congress National Book Festival, in conjunction with the Mexican Cultural Institute, will present a dialogue on the works and contributions of three giants of Mexican literature – the poets Octavio Paz and Efraín Huerta and the novelist José Revueltas, all of whom were born in 1914.

Panelists will include poets Marcelo Uribe and Coral Bracho. Marcelo Uribe is a Mexican poet that has published a number of original works. Uribe has also studied and published work in poetic translations. Coral Bracho, also a Mexican poet, has published six books of her work and has also been the recipient of numerous grants and fellowships. The event, part of the Festival's first-ever evening attractions, will be from 6 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. in room 103A and B at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center.

More Information here





Walter E. Washington Convention Center
801 Mt Vernon Pl NW
Washington, DC 20001
August 30, 6:00pm


Alberto Ruy-Sánchez on Ocatvio Paz

June 25, 2014, 6:45pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

The Mexican Cultural Institute pleased to invite you to join us as Alberto Ruy Sánchez introduces us to the stunning world of Mexican Nobel Laureate Octavio Paz, in conjunction with our exhibition Octavio Paz: De la Palabra a la Mirada. Presenting his book Una Introducción a Octavio Paz, which won the José Fuentes Mares National Prize for Literature in Mexico, he will explore the artistic and personal trajectory of one of Mexico's literary titans. Don't miss this unique opportunity to see one of Mexico's most heralded living authors expound on the life of Octavio Paz!

Alberto Ruy Sánchez is a Mexican writer and editor, born in 1951 and author of tewnty-three books of fiction, non-fiction and poetry translated to fifteen languages. His Ph.D. is from The University of Paris, where he lived for almost eight years. His novel Mogador, published by City Lights in San Francisco in 1993, was awarded the Xavier Villaurrutia Prize, the most prestigious litterary recognition in Mexico. The University of New Mexico awarded him as Litterary essayist in 1991 an he was also a Fellow of the J.S. Guggenheim Foundation. Since 1988 he has been the Chief Editor and founding publisher of Latin America's leading Arts Magazine: Artes de Mexico.

In February 2000 he was decorated by the French Government as Officier de l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres. The Governor of Kentucky named him a "Kentucky Colonel", the highest distinction given in that State, where he is also an Honorary Captain of La Belle de Louisville, the oldest steamship navigating the of the Mississippi River. He has been a visiting professor at several universities including Stanford, Middlebury and La Sorbonne, and has been invited to give lectures in Europe, Africa, Asia, North America and South America. His work has been praised by Octavio Paz, Juan Rulfo, Severo Sarduy, Alberto Manguel and Claude Michel Cluny and has received awards from over a dozen Mexican and international institutions.

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2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
June 25, 6:45pm
Free Admission

To RSVP, click here


Música y Poesía con el ANLE

Del 6 al 8 de junio de 2014 en el Instituto Cultural Mexicano

 

Del 6 al 8 de junio del 2014 tendrá lugar el Primer Congreso de la Academia Norteamericana de la Lengua Española para conmemorar el 40 aniversario de su fundación. El evento tendrá una perspectiva multidisciplinar e incluirá análisis y reflexiones sobre la cultura, la economía, la historia, la lengua y las letras, la política, la sociedad y los medios actuales, todo ello bajo el título "La presencia hispana y el español de los Estados Unidos: unidad en la diversidad". Como parte de este congreso, el poeta y filósofo mexicano Jaime Labastida, Director de la Academia Mexicana de la Lengua, estará en el Instituto en el evento poético-musical en donde participarán músicos y escritores cuya obra se incluye en el libro Al pie de la casa Blanca, Antología de la ANLE. No te pierdas este paseo literario-cultural celebrando el ¡español en Estados Unidos!

2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
Del 6 al 8 de junio
Para registrarse, haga clic aquí


Roberto Kolb on Silvestre Revueltas

May 7, 2014, 6:45 pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

Don't miss Roberto Kolb's lecture on Mexican composer Silvestre Revueltas, as part of the Redes Festival! Join Kolb as he asks whether for Redes, Revueltas was composing for film or filming for music.

Roberto Kolb is today's leading Revueltas authority. A professor at the School of Music of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), he is the chief editor of the Revueltas Critical Edition, published by UNAM. He is also the founder and artistic director of Camerata de las Américas, an inter-American orchestra dedicated mainly to the research, recording and performance of twentieth century music written in the Americas. He has previously collaborated with PostClassical Ensemble for a Revueltas/Chavez festival at the Library of Congress.


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Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th Street NW DC
May 7, 2014 at 6:45 pm
Free Admission, RSVP recommended:
rsvp@instituteofmexicodc.org


From History To Science in the Early Modern Atlantic

April 29, 2014, 9:00am - 6:00pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

Please join us Tuesday, April 29th for a one-day symposium: From History to Science in the Early Modern Atlantic. The symposium will explore the role of indigenous people, ethnographers, and naturalists in the Spanish Atlantic in the development of early modern science. We will have a keynote by Jorge Cañizares Esguerra, two plenaries by José Pardo Tomás and Carlos Viesca Treviño and presentations by María Portuondo, Marcy Norton, Ralph Bauer and Jaime Marroquín Arredondo. Please see below for a tentative schedule.

The event is sponsored by the Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMSI) at George Washington University, the Kislak Family Foundation, the Early Americas Working Group, the Mexican Institute of Culture, the Embassy of Spain and George Washington University.


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Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th Street NW DC
April 29, 9:00am - 6:00pm
Free Admission, RSVP recommended:
RSVP Here


Pam Scott: Tour of the Mexican Cultural Institute

April 24, 2014, 3:00pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

Architecture Week is a series of public events that celebrate architecture in the nation's capital. With this 16th celebration, Architecture Week will shine a spotlight on Washington's foreign embassies and institutions, including our own Mexican Cultural Institute. Join us at 3pm on Thursday, April 24th for a tour of our 16th Street Mansion!

The tour will be led by esteemed architectural historian Pamela Scott, who specializes in the history of Washington's planning and built environment. She has taught the History of Washington Architecture at several universities and curated exhibits for the Library of Congress, National Building Museum, Capitol Historical Society, Historical Society of Washington, and Department of Interior Museum on topics from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries relating to Washington's history. Click here to read more about Pamela Scott.


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Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th Street NW DC
April 24, 3-4:30pm
Free Admission, RSVP recommended:
rsvp@instituteofmexicodc.org


Dr. James Oles at the District Architecture Center

April 21, 2014, 12:00pm at the District Architecture Center

 

Join us at the District Architecture Center for a lecture and book signing by Dr. James Oles. This lecture will explore questions in relation to Dr. Oles' new book Art and Architecture in Mexico, the first comprehensive survey covering the colonial through contemporary periods in almost fifty years!

The event is free to the public. Signed copies of Dr. Oles' book, "Art and Architecture in Mexico", will be available for $30. Please select the number of books you want to purchase at the end of the registration process. You must reserve your book(s) by April 7 if you would like to purchase.

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District Architecture Center
421 7th Street NW DC
April 21, 12:00pm
Free Admission, RSVP recommended:
Register here


Mario Bellatin at American University

April 16, 2014, 5:30-7:00pm at the Letts Formal Lounge, American University

 

Join us at American University for a panel discussion featuring Mario Bellatin, one of Mexico's foremost writers! The discussion will feature fellow Mexican writer Yuri Herrera and AU professors Ana Serra and Juliana Martínez, and will be followed by a reception. The event will be in Spanish.

Mario Bellatin's approach to an experimental consciousness marks the standard of convex writing in contemporary Latin American literature. Bellatin was born in Mexico, grew up in Peru, and studied screenwriting in Cuba. Among his more well-known works is his book "Flowers", which won the Premio Xavier Villaurrutia in 2001. He was the recipient of a Guggenheim grant in 2002, and Nobel Prizewinning author Mario Vargas Llosa described him as "one of the most interesting writers that have arisen in Latin America in recent years." Read the New York Times profile of Bellatin here.

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Letts Formal Lounge
4400 Massachusetts Ave NW
Washington, DC 20016
April 16, 5:30-7:00pm


Conference: Music of the Mexican Revolution

April 11, 2014, 1-6pm at the McNeir Hall Auditorium

 

Don't miss an exploration of the music of Mexico and the Gulf coast region of Veracruz from 1910-1940 with Georgetown's Dr. John Tutino! The afternoon will mix popular music, discussions of diverse peoples facing revolutionary challenges, examinations of the rise of the Mexican film industry, all focusing on the 1935 film Redes—a Mexican production, filmed in Veracruz, involving Paul Strand and Fred Zinneman, with music by the great Mexican composer, Silvestre Revueltas.


Program

1:15 Son Jarocho — Traditional Folk Music of Coastal Veracruz by Trio Jarocho Guachintón

2:15 Rethinking Revolution in Mexico and Veracruz — Chair, Professor John Tutino, Georgetown

"Revolutionary Conflicts, Contradictory Outcomes, 1910-1920", Rodolfo Fernández PH.D, History, Georgetown

"Can a Regime Be a Revolution?" Mexico 1920-1940", John Tutino, Professor, History and SFS, Georgetown

"Rethinking Post-Revolutionary Veracruz: Society and Politics, 1920-1940" — Heather Fowler-Salamini, Professor of History, Emerita, Bradley University

3:45 Film and Filmaking in Post-Revolutionary Mexico — Chair, Bernard Cook, Associate Dean, Director of Film and Media Studies, Georgetown

"Dolores del Río and the Golden Age of Mexican Film", Barbara Mujica, Professor, Spanish and Portuguese, Georgetown

"Paul Strand, Redes, and Mexico in the 1930's", James Krippner, Professor, History, Haverford College

5:15 Redes and Revueltas: Selections — Georgetown University Orchestra conducted by Angel Gil Ordóñez. Selections from Silvestre Revueltas' score while showing excerpts from the recently re-mastered 1934 film.

This event is part of a constellation of events comprising PostClassical's Mexican Festival Redes.

THE TALK
Wed May 7
Mexican Cultural Institute
A multimedia presentation by the preeminent Revueltas scholar Roberto Kolb.


THE CONCERT AND FILM SCREENING
Sat, May 10
Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center
University of Maryland

See more about the events on the PCE website

McNeir Hall Auditorium
37th and O St. NW
Washington DC 20057
April 11, 1-6pm
Free Admission

RSVP to info@postclassical.com


PostClassical Ensemble Book Club: Viva Zapata!

April 5, 2014, 10:30am at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

This season's PostClassical Ensemble Book Club event features the Marlon Brando film Viva Zapata! (1952), scripted by John Steinbeck. The assigned book is John Steinbeck's Zapata. Join us for a screening and discussion, led by Georgetown University's John Tutino (a historian of Mexico and its revolutions) and Jorge Hernandez (Mexican historian and writer).

Like Aaron Copland, Paul Strand, and many others from the US, John Steinbeck (who spoke Spanish) was galvanized by the Mexico he discovered in the 1930s — the land, its people, and the prospect of radical social and political change. He wrote a treatment for a film on the life and times of martyred revolutionary Emiliano Zapata, a text long lost and now published as Zapata, which reflected his optimism. And yet the Viva Zapata film project in which he participated projects a different perception of Mexico ensnared in the politics of the Cold War and the Red Scare. Elia Kazan, the film's director, was called to DC to name names before the House Un-American Activities Committee (he had been told by Darryl Zanuck that the film would otherwise be abandoned). And — as documented in Steinbeck's Zapata — the script had undergone a fundamental change of its own.

Compared to the iconic Mexican film masterpiece Redes, Viva Zapata! fails to capture the Mexico that inspired and amazed John Steinbeck. Why? What happened? How were the best intentions squandered and distorted? Read Steinbeck's original vision in Zapata, come and join us in viewing Viva Zapata!, and explore with us why and how a vision of Mexico as a land of promise in the 1930s became something else in the 1950s.

With the participation of Angel Gil-Ordóñez and Joseph Horowitz, PostClassical Ensemble's music and executive directors. Click here to see Joseph Horowitz talk about the event on Youtube.

This event is part of a constellation of events comprising PostClassical's Mexican Festival Redes.

THE CONFERENCE
Fri Apr 11
Georgetown University
curated by John Tutino


THE TALK
Wed May 7
Mexican Cultural Institute
A multimedia presentation by the preeminent Revueltas scholar Roberto Kolb.


THE CONCERT AND FILM SCREENING
Sat, May 10
Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center
University of Maryland

See more about the events on the PCE website

2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
April 5, 10:30am
Free Admission

RSVP to rsvp@instituteofmexicodc.org


Jaime Perales: Paz's Intellectual Circle

March 31, 2014, 6:45pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

As a remembrance for Octavio Paz's centennial, The Embassy of Mexico, through its Mexican Cultural Institute, is honored to host the lecture "Octavio Paz and His Circle", by Jaime Perales Contreras.

Mr. Perales' lecture is based on his new biographical study Octavio Paz y su círculo intelectual (Ediciones Coyoacán/ITAM 2013).

The new book on Mr. Paz brings together biography, literary criticism and political essay as genres. Finalist of the 20th Comillas Award of Biography, in Barcelona, Spain, the book presents new insights on writers and intellectuals whom the poet met along his career. Mr. Perales goes deep into Octavio Paz's unique and fresh standpoint as editor of the magazines Plural (1971-1976) and Vuelta (1976-1998), as well as the cultural project that his two legendary publications gave to all Hispanic America. Nobel Prize for Literature winner Mario Vargas Llosa calls the novel "A mandatory reading for understanding the politics and culture of the last twenty years in the Americas of the twentieth century".

Jaime Perales Contreras was born in Mexico City. He earned his PhD in literature and cultural studies from Georgetown University, and a Master's degree in International Relations from the Edmund Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown. He did his undergraduate studies in social sciences at ITAM. His previous work on Mr. Paz influenced quite a few studies on the poet's work. He worked for 12 years at the Organization of American States (OAS) in the fields of Democracy and Humanitarian Security. He collaborated with different publications in Mexico, the United States and Brazil. As lecturer, he taught at the Foreign Service Institute (FSI), the school for U.S. diplomatic personnel based in Rosslyn, VA, at Georgetown University in Washington DC, The Ibero-American University and ITAM in Mexico, City. He was a recipient of the William Fulbright Scholarship, The British Council Award Scholarship and the Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACYT).

2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
March 31, 6:45pm
Free Admission

RSVP to rsvp@instituteofmexicodc.org


Carmen Boullosa: Mexico's Extraordinary Women

March 26, 2014, 6:45pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

Mexican author Carmen Boullosa visits the Institute in conjunction with International Women's Day for her lecture Las Singulares Mexicanas: Mexico's Extraordinary Women at the Mexican Cultural Institute on Wednesday, March 26th! Don't miss this exciting opportunity to delve into the mind of one of Mexico's leading novelists, poets and playwrights.

Mexico's extraordinary women aren't the monsters from the hinterlands (like the fabled spider-woman), rather, they are the cornerstones of creation for both the collective imagination and reality of Mexico. Through these women, we recognize that the extraordinary is simply that which best captures reality.

From Sor Juana to Elena Garro, from the early 20th century insurgents to Dolores Jiménez y Muro—although some have been forgotten by history, Mexico's women have imparted an extraordinary narrative of Mexico past and present.

Carmen Boullosa is a prolific author, who has had literally scores of books, essays and dissertations written about her work, has been lauded by critics on several continents, and has won many of Spanish literature's top prizes, both in Mexico and abroad. "As playful as a mischievous Puck," says Elena Poniatowska; she has "a heart-stopping command of language," says Alma Guillermoprieto; "one of the most dazzling of Latin America's new generation," according to Publishers Weekly; "Mexico's best woman writer," wrote Roberto Bolaño.

Her most recent English translation, Cleopatra Dismounts, "lavishly reimagines the life of the legendary Cleopatra of Egypt in a daring intermingling of fantasy and history," according to one reviewer, and the Washington Post spoke of the book's "exhilarating" and "incantatory prose" which left the reader "yearning for more of this talented author's work."

2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
March 26, 6:45pm
Free Admission

RSVP to rsvp@instituteofmexicodc.org


Adriana Zavala: Pressure from the Margins

March 13, 2014, 6:45pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

Don't miss Lola Álvarez Bravo, María Izquierdo, and Frida Kahlo: Pressure from the Margins, a lecture that explores the contributions of three dynamic women to the vibrant cultural "renaissance" that followed the Mexican Revolution (1910-1920). Although frequently overshadowed by their male counterparts, each made a pioneering contribution to the advancement of Mexican art and culture. This lecture will consider their role as women within the Mexican art world of their day, as well as expounding on their work at the crossroads of revolutionary culture and the international avant-garde.

Adriana Zavala is Associate Professor of Art History at Tufts University. She received her PhD from Brown University, with a specialization in modern Mexican art. Her book "Becoming Modern, Becoming Tradition: Women Gender and Representation in Mexican Art" (Penn State University Press, 2010) was awarded the Arvey Prize by the Association of Latin American Art in 2011. She is presently writing a book on the collage technique in Mexican art. Her curatorial work includes: "Lola Alvarez Bravo: the Photography of an Era", shown at the Diego Rivera Studio Museum in Mexico City (2010), the Museum of Latin American Art, Long Beach (2011), and in expanded form at the Center for Creative Photography, Tucson, AZ (2013); "Mexico Beyond Its Revolution" for the Tufts University Art Galleries (2010); and, "Maria Izquierdo: Un Arte Nuevo" for the Blaisten Collection at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (2007). She is currently developing an exhibition on Frida Kahlo.

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2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
March 13, 6:45pm
Free Admission

RSVP to rsvp@instituteofmexicodc.org


Alejandro Cartagena at Georgetown

February 24, 2014, 6:00pm at the Georgetown University Spagnuolo Art Gallery

 

Don't miss a lecture with noted Mexican photographer Alejandro Cartagena, as he discusses the images from "The Car Poolers" exhibition in the context of the "Suburbia Mexicana" project, which focuses on the complexity of rapid urbanization in 21st century Mexico. Throughout this body of work, Cartagena has directed his eye and camera towards the changing scenes around his home city of Monterrey, Mexico. In the photographs, he objectively records home ownership, urban sprawl, environmental degradation, and government policy. A reception will follow the talk in the Walsh lobby opposite the Spagnuolo Art Gallery.

"The Car Poolers", an exhibit running from February 5th to April 6th, 2014 at Georgetown's Spagnuolo Art Gallery considers the interdependence of humans and landscape in the face of urban expansion. Although artists and activists alike have focused on the negative impact of urban sprawl since the 1960s, Cartagena's work is unique in its preoccupation with the largely overlooked, irrevocable effects of suburban expansion within a local ecosystem.

The Mexican Cultural Institute is proud to collaborate with the Department of Spanish and Portuguese and the Spagnuolo Art Gallery of Georgetown University. on this unique event.

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Department of Art and Art History
Georgetown University
Walsh Building, Suite 102
1221 36th St, N.W.
Washington D.C. 20057
Phone: (202) 687.7010
For information, email artinfo@georgetown.edu


The Wailing Wall

February 20, 2014, 6:45pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

The Embassy of Mexico, through its Cultural Institute, is honored to host an exhibit that reconstructs the history of Diego Rivera's Man at the Crossroads mural, thanks to the Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo Museums and Bank of America Merrill Lynch.

As a complementary event, we are pleased to present the lecture The Wailing Wall: Diego Rivera at Rockefeller Center on Thursday, February 20th at the Mexican Cultural Institute.

The talk, featuring world-renowned artist Pablo Ortiz Monasterio and Diego Rivera expert Dr. Susana Pliego, will explore a behind-the-scenes examination of Rivera's mural at Rockefeller Center. Featuring insights from the book Man at the Crossroads: Diego Rivera's Mural at Rockefeller Center (published by Museo Diego Rivera Anahuacalli and TRILCE Editions), the lecture will provide a unique window into our current exhibition.

Join us to experience our Man at the Crossroads exhibition from a deeper, more profound perspective, featuring two of Mexico's brightest luminaries on the subject!

Pablo Ortiz Monasterio was born in Mexico City in 1952. He has published nine books of his photographic work, including "La última ciudad" featuring a text by José Emilio Pacheco, which earned him the best photographic book prize of the 1998 Photographic Spring Festival in Barcelona, and the Gold Eye of the Festival des Trois Continents, 1997 in France. He has had individual exhibitions in Museo de Arte Moderno, Centro de la Imagen and Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico, and in museums and galleries of the United States, Brazil, Argentina, Venezuela, Ecuador, Cuba, Spain, England, France, Holland, Portugal and Italy.

Susana Pliego Quijano is a PhD in Art History from the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) specialized in Mexican modern art. As an academic coordinator in the Fundación Diego Rivera, she was in charge of the inventory and catalog of Diego Rivera's personal archive. She currently teaches graduate courses of image analysis and modern art at the ENAH. She is co-author of Man at the Crossroads: Diego Rivera's mural at Rockefeller Center, published in 2013.

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2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
February 20, 6:45pm
Free Admission

RSVP to rsvp@instituteofmexicodc.org


Barbara Tenenbaum on the Mexican Revolution

February 5, 2014, 6:45pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 


In this illustrated talk, Dr. Barbara Tenenbaum, Specialist in Mexican Culture in the Hispanic Division of the Library of Congress, will discuss the nature of the Mexican Revolution: what it was and what it was not. She will show how this first lasting Revolution of the twentieth century was much more about Mexico than about Revolution, and how the nation grew into its Constitution of 1917.

Barbara A. Tenenbaum received her Ph.D. at Harvard University where she studied under John Womack, Jr. She has taught at Vassar College, the University of South Carolina, and Howard and Catholic Universities. She joined the Library of Congress as Specialist in Mexican Culture in 1992.

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2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
February 5, 6:45pm
Free Admission

RSVP to rsvp@instituteofmexicodc.org


A Celebration of Mexico

December 12-13, 2013 at the Library of Congress

 

“A Celebration of Mexico,” a two-day conference and accompanying display at the Library of Congress, will open on December 12, the Day of the Virgin of Guadalupe, a popular national holiday in Mexico. The event will feature music, film, sound recordings—all from the Library—as well as presentations by eminent Mexican and Mexican-American writers, artists, and scholars. It will shine a bright light on Mexican identity as well as on the Mexican American experience. It will be moderated by chief curators of the Library of Congress, who are uniquely equipped to tell this story.

Among the confirmed speakers are: Miguel León-Portilla, world-renowned for his scholarship on the ancient language of Náhuatl, which is still spoken by one and a half million people in Central America. Enrique Krauze, Mexico’s leading public intellectual, who has written some of the most bracing perspectives on Mexican and Latin American history. The prizewinning novelists Carmen Boullosa, Álvaro Enrigue, and Jorge Volpi, whose works have opened a new way for Mexican letters. Leonardo López Luján, the preeminent archaeologist and historian of pre-Hispanic Mexico, whose Templo Mayor project is unearthing the Aztec metropolis that lies beneath Mexico City. Sandra Cisneros, the acclaimed American author, who wrote the memorable, groundbreaking novel about Mexican-American identity, The House on Mango Street.

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The Library of Congress
Thomas Jefferson Building
Coolidge Auditorium
10 First Street, SE
Washington, DC 20540
December 12-13, 2013
RSVP: here



Las relaciones México-Estados Unidos 1756-2010

November 19, 2013, 6:30pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

On Tuesday, November 19th at 6:30pm, esteemed scholars from Mexico and the US will meet at the Institute to discuss the book Las relaciones México-Estados Unidos 1756-2010, in a conversational format.

The book offers an integral historical perspective on our neighboring countries and the significant changes in policy and relationship throughout more than two centuries of bilateral relationship.

The event will be moderated by Dr. Silvia Núñez, and will feature Drs. Leonardo Curzio, John Tutino, and Duncan Wood, alongside the presence of the book's authors Marcela Terrazas, Gerardo Gurza, Paolo Riguzzi, and Patricia de los Ríos.

This event will be in Spanish.

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Book published by the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México and the Secretaría de Relaciones Exteriores



Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th Street NW DC
November 19, 6:30pm
RSVP: rsvp@instituteofmexicodc.org



Sharon-Michi Kusunoki on Edward James

November 5, 2013, 6:30pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

The man commonly known as Edward James is largely a myth, a myth defined by the adjectives used to describe him—eccentric, wealthy, illegitimate, collector, surrealist. This talk will examine Edward James' life commencing with his American roots and then exploring the path James' life took that led him from West Dean, a 6,000 acre estate in Chichester, West Sussex in England, to the jungles of Xilitla, Mexico, where he created his 'Garden of Eden,' one of the most extraordinary surrealist wonders of the world.

Sharon-Michi Kusunoki is the Director of the biennial International Symposium of Surrealism and is the Director of Research, Exhibitions and Collections at The Edward James Foundation in England. Dr Kusunoki has contributed to several international publications and has lectured and written extensively on Edward James and surrealism.

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Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th Street NW DC
November 5, 6:30pm
RSVP:
rsvp@instituteofmexicodc.org



Guerrero Artisans Workshop

September 24, 2013, 10am at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

The Mexican Cultural Institute is proud to announce a special artisan event, open to just twenty artists and enthusiasts, which will feature maestros Javier González Rodríguez and Edwin Gess Cabañas Acevedo from Guerrero, Mexico in conjunction with our ongoing exhibition Guerrero, Seven Regions of Art and Tradition.

Attendees will first hear a conference entitled "Saving and Preserving the Maque Art of Guerrero", which will be followed by a workshop on the distinct lacquer techniques of Olinalá, unique work methods that trace their roots to the Guerrero area over a millennium ago.

Don't miss this unique artistic event at the Mexican Cultural Institute!



2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
September 24, 10:00am
Free Admission

RSVP: porozco@instituteofmexicodc.org


Alejandro Pintado: Path of Knowledge

October 16, 2013, 6:30pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

Don't miss renowned Mexican artist Alejandro Pintado's lecture, entitled "Path of Knowledge", at the Mexican Cultural Institute on Wednesday, October 16th! The talk will focus on the creative process involved in the production of an artwork. Exploring the notion of collage in everyday life situations between the past and present, from everyday life situations and objects that involve music, design, history and technology, Pintado seeks to juxtapose conflicting artistic concepts and ask questions about what is to be contemporary.

Alejandro Pintado studied art in Mexico and London, before being awarded New York's prestigious Pollock-Krasner Fellowship in 2007. His work has been shown in numerous exhibitions in both the Americas and Europe, and has over a dozen solo exhibitions to his name, including his latest show, "Trayectoria del conocimiento", presented at the Museo Nacional de Arte as part of a national homage to José María Velasco. Currently, Pintado is working on the publication of a book of his most recent work and preparing a solo show for the end of the year.

This lecture is made possible through collaboration with Mexico's National Endowment for the Arts (FONCA).

Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th Street NW DC
October 16, 6:30pm
RSVP:
rsvp@instituteofmexicodc.org



Dialogue with Arturo Ripstein

September 24, 2013, at the American University

 

Join American University for an evening with renowned Mexican director Arturo Ripstein, as he talks with AU film professors, dissecting the craft of a short film that will screen that evening. Ripstein, famous in the US for such critically acclaimed films as Deep Crimson (1996) and Such is Life (2000) is one of the most laureled film directors in Mexico's rich cinematic history.

Maestro Ripstein will be joined by AU professors Lucy Grandas, Jeffrey Middents, Núria Villanova, and Brenda Werth. The event will be in English, and a reception will follow. For more information, please contact Dennis Stinchcomb at denniss@american.edu

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September 24, 5:30pm
in the Letts Formal Lounge at American University
Free Admission

4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW
American University






Master Artisans of Guerrero Workshop and Conference

September 24, 2013, 10am at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

The Mexican Cultural Institute is proud to announce a special artisan event, open to just twenty artists and enthusiasts, which will feature maestros Javier González Rodríguez and Edwin Gess Cabañas Acevedo from Guerrero, Mexico in conjunction with our ongoing exhibition Guerrero, Seven Regions of Art and Tradition.

Attendees will first hear a conference entitled "Saving and Preserving the Maque Art of Guerrero", which will be followed by a workshop on the distinct lacquer techniques of Olinalá, unique work methods that trace their roots to the Guerrero area over a millennium ago.

Don't miss this unique artistic event at the Mexican Cultural Institute!



2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
September 24, 10am
Free Admission

RSVP: porozco@instituteofmexicodc.org


Two Spanish Lectures with Luis Vargas

September 8, 2013, 5:30pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

August 14, 2013, 5:00pm at the Mexican Embassy

 

Don't miss two Spanish lectures on Mexican Muralism and photography by Luis Vargas, doctoral candidate at UT-Austin. The first of these FONCA-sponsored lectures will take place at the Mexican Cultural Institute on Thursday, August 8th, titled "Muralismo Mexicano: institucionalización y arte revolucionario." The second, "Zapata y la diáspora mexicana en imágenes" will take place the following Wednesday, August 14th at the Mexican Embassy, at 1911 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW.

Please note: these lectures will be in Spanish without translation. To RSVP, email porozco@instituteofmexicodc.org

Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th Street NW DC
RSVP: porozco@instituteofmexicodc.org





Dreamscapes: A lecture by Edward Sullivan

February 7, 2013 at the Mexican Cultural Institute

During such cataclysmic events in Europe as the Spanish Civil War and World War II, many émigré artists found a welcoming home in Mexico City. Figures such as Leonora Carrington, Remedios Varo, Wolfgang Paalen and Alice Rahon spent significant years in the Mexican capital. Each of them was associated with Surrealism as it had developed in Europe under the watchful eye of Andre Breton, the "high priest" of the movement (who had also come to Mexico in the late 1930s). Their work was shown side-by-side or shared affinities with that of Mexican painters such as Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, Carlos Orozco Romero and María Izquierdo and many others. This lecture will explore the complex and fascinating reasons why Surrealism enjoyed such popularity in Mexico around 1940 and how Mexico City rivaled Paris as a center of Surrealist artistic invention.

Edward J. Sullivan is professor of the history of art at New York University. He is the author of over thirty books and exhibition catalogues in the field of Latin American and Caribbean art. Much of his scholarship has focused on Mexican art of the twentieth century. Among his most recent publications are The Language of Objects in the Art of the Americas and Fragile Demon: Juan Soriano in Mexico 1935-1950.

Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th Street NW DC
February 7, 6:30pm
Free Admission, RSVP recommended:
rsvp@instituteofmexicodc.org


Hugo Brehme's Timeless Mexico

January 29, 2013, 6:30pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

Join us for a lecture by Susan Toomey Frost, distinguished Hugo Brehme scholar and author of Timeless Mexico: The Photographs of Hugo Brehme as she explores the Mexican Cultural Institute's Visions of Mexico, an exhibit of Brehme's photography, on display until March 2nd.

An avid collector, Susan Toomey Frost is a leading authority on Mexican and Guatemalan postcards. Her articles have appeared in publications in the United States, Mexico and Germany, as well as online at susanfrost.org.

Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th Street NW DC
January 29, 6:30pm
Free Admission, RSVP recommended:
rsvp@instituteofmexicodc.org


Cloud Traces: Voices from the Codex of our Memories

December 11, 2012, 6:30pm Mexican Cultural Institute

 

The Mexican Cultural Institute is proud to welcome Zapotec scholars Victor Cata and Emiliano Cruz Santiago to lecture on texts recovered from Zapotec knowledge bearers considered to be living codices, safeguarding the memory of the Peoples of the Clouds. The texts are from Juchitán in the Isthmus of Tehuantepec and from San Bartolomé Loxicha in the Southern Sierra—both Zapotec towns but with distinct Zapotec languages and cultural practices.

Emiliano Cruz Santiago, from the University of Sonora, will present a collection of omens and superstitions which are deemed truths by the people of San Bartolomé Loxicha. The Fondo Nacional para La Cultura y Las Artes' Victor Cata will give a voice to the echos of the Libana, ceremonial speeches that consecrate the act of marriage in Isthmus Zapotec communities.

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Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th Street NW
Washington, DC 20009
RSVP to rsvp@instituteofmexicodc.org
Take metro to the Columbia Heights Station


Pedro Reyes Lecture at the Phillips Collection

November 29th 2012, 6pm at the Phillips Collection Museum

 

On Thursday, November 29th, The Phillips Collection continues its Conversations with Artists series with Mexican artist Pedro Reyes. Reyes's works--a temporary clinic, a puppet show, a man-propelled vehicle--examine the contradictions of modern life, address the interplay between physical and social space, and call for political and economic participation. In conversation with Senior Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art Vesela Sretenovic. This event is in collaboration with the George Washington University, Washington, D.C.

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The Phillips Collection
1600 21st NW DC
November 29th, 6pm
Free for students, $5 for members


Book Presentation with John Tutino

December 3, 2012, 6:30pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

John Tutino, editor of the new book Mexico and Mexicans in the Making of the United States will join us here at the Institute in early December. He will be joined by authors Katherine Benton-Cohen and Jose Limon, who will reflect on their chapters and the larger perspectives they raise.

This new book, sponsored by the Georgetown University Americas Initiative and published by the University of Texas Press, aims to shift the conversation from the "problem" of Mexicans--citizens and migrants--in the United States to focus on how Mexico and Mexicans have contributed in pivotal ways to creating and shaping the US. The volume discusses the role of New Spain in founding American capitalism; nineteenth-century cultural and economic interactions between Mexico and the US in times of war and peace; Mexican participations in migration and labor in the US West around 1900; and the twentieth-century rise of a Mexican-American middle class and its openness to ethnic amalgamation--in contrast to traditions of racial polarity.

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Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th Street NW DC
December 3, 6:30pm
RSVP Requested
rsvp@instituteofmexicodc.org


Artists-in-Residence Lecture at the Corcoran

Thursday, November 15th 2012, 7:00pm at the Corcoran Gallery of Art

 

Join us at the Corcoran Gallery for a lecture by the Mexican Cultural Institute's Artists-in-Residence Eduardo Abaroa and Sofia Taboas on Thursday, November 15th at 7pm.

Eduardo is a contemporary Mexican artist and writer working in the fields of sculpture, installation, and live action. A prominent figure in the Mexican art scene since the 1990s, Abaroa founded and worked in the artist-run space Temistocles 44, and has exhibited in solo and group shows in prestigious museums in Mexico, Los Angeles, New York, Argentina, and Germany. Sofia Taboas is a respected artist whose evocative, ambiguous works have been shown all over Mexico. Join them as they discuss their artwork and provide a context for today's contemporary Mexican art.

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Corcoran Gallery of Art
500 17th St NW
Washington, DC 20006
Tickets: $10 for friends of the Institute


Architecture Week Tour of the Mexican Cultural Institute

September 28, 2012 at 12:00pm, at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 


Architecture Week is a series of public events that celebrate architecture in the nation's capital. With this 14th celebration, Architecture Week will shine a spotlight on Washington's foreign embassies and institutions, including our own Mexican Cultural Institute. Join us at noon on Friday, September 28th for a tour of our 16th Street Mansion, highlighting the several distinctive features designed by architect Nathan Wyeth, including the Entrance Hall, distinguished by an elaborately carved staircase that leads to the upper floors; the Music Room and the pipes of the Aeolian organ on the north wall, which were installed from the basement to the fourth floor; and the Dining Room, for many years the largest private one in all of DC. For more information visit the event's website.

The tour will be given by the esteemed architectural historian Pamela Scott, who specializes in the history of Washington's planning and built environment. She has taught the History of Washington Architecture at several universities and curated exhibits for the Library of Congress, National Building Museum, Capitol Historical Society, Historical Society of Washington, and Department of Interior Museum on topics from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries relating to Washington's history.
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Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th Street NW DC
September 28, 12-1:30pm
Free Admission, RSVP recommended:
rsvp@instituteofmexicodc.org


Lecture: Alberto Ruy-Sanchez at American University

September 20, 2012, 4 - 5:30pm at the American University School of International Service

 

The Mexican National Council for Culture and the Arts (CONACULTA) and the Center for Latin American and Latino Studies (CLALS) are pleased to invite you to join us as Alberto Ruy Sánchez traces the unique literary journey that led to El Quinteto de Mogador, a five-novel series born out of the author's travels between Mexico and Morocco. The event will be held in English with a reception to follow. For more information, please contact Dennis Stinchcomb or 202-885-6710. Visit the AU event calendar here.

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American University CLALS
Abramson Family Founders Room, SIS Building
Free Admission


Murals and the Mayan Tradition with Diana Magaloni

September 13, 2012, 6:30pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

Join us for an evening of anthropological inquiry with Diana Magaloni, director of Mexico's celebrated Museum of Anthropology and History, as she delivers a lecture entitled "Mural Painting and the Mayan Tradition: Materials, Techniques, and Artists." The famed pre-Columbian murals preserve some of the finest examples of Mayan painting, including striking use of Maya blue, the vibrant azure pigment whose usage dates to around 800 CE.
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Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th Street NW DC
September 13, 6:30pm
Free Admission, RSVP recommended:
rsvp@instituteofmexicodc.org


Mexico's Art World in the Wake of the Revolution

May 31, 2012 at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

The Mexican Revolution--that violent, inchoate, never-quite-complete break with the past--opened a new era in Mexican art and letters now known as the "Mexican Renaissance." In Mexico City, a coterie of artists including Diego Rivera, José Clemente Orozco, and David Alfaro Siqueiros explored how art could forward revolutionary ideals--and, in the process, spent countless hours talking, gossiping, arguing, and partying. Into this milieu came Anita Brenner, in her early twenties already trying her hand as a journalist, art critic, and anthropologist. Her journals of the period 1925 to 1930 vividly transport us to this vital moment in Mexico, when building a "new nation" was the goal.

Brenner became a member of Rivera's inner circle, and her journals provide fascinating portraits of its members, including Orozco, Siqueiros, Rufino Tamayo, and Jean Charlot, with whom she had an unusual loving relationship. She captures the major and minor players in the act of creating works for which they are now famous and records their comings and goings, alliances and feuds. Numerous images of their art brilliantly counterpoint her diary descriptions. Brenner also reveals her own maturation as a perceptive observer and writer who, at twenty-four, published her first book, Idols Behind Altars. Her initial plan for Idols included four hundred images taken by photographers Edward Weston and Tina Modotti. Many of these images, which were ultimately not included in Idols, are published here for the first time along with stunning portraits of Brenner herself. Setting the scene for the journal is well-known Mexican cultural critic Carlos Monsiváis, who offers an illuminating discussion of the Mexican Renaissance and the circle around Diego Rivera.

Editor Susannah Joel Glusker, daughter of Anita Brenner and author of the book Anita Brenner: A Mind of Her Own, will discuss her mother's journals. She teaches "Mexican Women of Note" and "Mexican Art of the Early Twentieth Century" at the Universidad Iberoamericana, translates, and writes for various publications.


Homero Aridijis at the Split This Rock Poetry Festival

June 20, 2012 in Washington, DC

 

The Split This Rock Poetry Festival: Poems of Provocation & Witness invites poets, writers, activists, and dreamers to Washington, DC for four days of poetry, community building, and creative transformation. The festival features readings, workshops, panel discussions, youth programming, parties, activism--opportunities to speak out for justice, build connection and community, and celebrate the many ways poetry can act as an agent for social change.

This year, Mexican poet, novelist, environmental activist, journalist and diplomat Homero Aridjis will be reading on Friday, March 23, at 7:30 pm. He'll also be participating in a panel discussion on poetry and environmental justice on Saturday, March 24, at 2 pm.


Conference: A Conversation about Mexican Contemporary Design

June 20, 2012 at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

Join us for a conversation with Kathy Thornton-Bias, President of the Retail Division at The Museum of Modern Art in New York City, Ana Ellena Mallet, independent curator who specializes in contemporary art and design, and Hector Esrawe, Industrial Designer, founder and current member of Nel Collective. They will discuss MoMA's perspective on design and its insertion in the market, the current trends in contemporary design in Mexico and particular projects developed by designers and design collectives in Mexico.









Conference: Rufino Tamayo and Mexican Modernism

May 19, 2012 at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

Known for his captivating use of color, Rufino Tamayo created a unique form of modernism in Mexico. At the forefront of taking on the international/national and abstraction/figuration debates that preoccupied modern Mexican artists during 1920s and 1930s, he promoted a new type of abstract figuration that privileged personal myths while also engaging with issues of Mexican cultural identity. He challenged the monumentality, politicization, and institutionalization of mainstream Mexican Art of his time, especially Muralism, in which he also took part, to warn of the limits of nationalism and the necessity to incorporate internationalism/universalism into diverse aesthetic programs. Tamayo synthesized the aesthetics of the European vanguards with Mexican content and form in a dynamic tension. His refusal to be didactic, yet his insistence on promoting Mexican aesthetics and motifs, has had a profound legacy on the development of modernism in Mexico, the United States, and Europe, places he lived and worked throughout his life.

Dr. Anna Indych - Lopez will discuss Tamayo's various aesthetic influences, the contexts in which he worked, and the ways in which he constructed a new paradigm for Mexican painting.


Conference: Enrique Norten, Architect

May 1, 2012 at the National Building Museum

 

Architect Enrique Norten explains why he relies less on inspiration than on a complex and analytical research-focused design process. See for yourself as the founding principal of TEN Arquitectos presents the firm's recent work, including One York Street, and the Guggenheim Museum in Guadalajara, Mexico. Norten has also designed two striking new buildings for Washington, D.C.'s West End. G. Martin Moeller, Jr., the Museum's senior vice president and curator, moderates a discussion between Norten and his client, Eastbanc's Anthony Lanier, about these projects and modern architecture in the nation's capital.





Conference: Diego Rivera in New York

February 2, 2012 at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

In December 1931, two years after its founding, The Museum of Modern Art inaugurated a major exhibition of the work of Diego Rivera. Rivera -a forty five year old, openly Communist, Mexican artist- may have seemed an unlikely choice for the young Museum's second only retrospective, but the show was wildly popular. Rivera's international celebrity was based on his fame as a muralist.

But murals -by definition fixed on site- were impossible to transport. In order to solve this problem, the Museum brought Rivera to New York from Mexico six weeks before the opening, and installed him in a makeshift studio space in an empty gallery. There he produced eight "portable" murals -freestanding fresco panels- which were featured in the show. Five of these monumental works are now on view in the exhibition at The Museum of Modern Art, along with working drawings and related material.

Curator Leah Dickerman will discuss Rivera's extraordinary commission for MoMA, as well as his ill-fated mural for Rockefeller Center. Together these projects provide a compelling perspective on the intersection of art making and radical politics in the 1930s.


The Music of Carlos Chavez

January 29, 2012 at The Mexican Cultural Institute

 

This special presentation, co-organized with the Latin American Center for Graduate Studies in Music of Catholic University, will include a lecture and concert in honor of Dr. Robert L. Parker, a distinguished scholar of Mexican music. The afternoon will begin with a lecture entitled "Carlos Chávez and Modernism" delivered by musicologist Dr. Christina Taylor Gibson, followed by a concert featuring music by Carlos Chávez -including his early piano pieces, Madrigal for cello and piano, Soli No. 1 and the String Quartet No. 3 (Mov. I)- and selected songs by Silvestre Revueltas.

The program will feature music school faculty members José Ramos Santana (pianist) and Michael Mermagen (cellist) , Nicolas Catravas (piano); alumna Rachel Barham (soprano); and current students Anamer Castrello (mezzo soprano), Flor Maryory Serrano Prada and Nicholas Perry (violinists), Hsiao-Chun Lin (viola), and Fanny Nemeth (cellist).