Exhibits    |

    Music    |

    Cinema    |

    Conferences and Lectures    |

    Culinary Events    |

    Other Events        


September 28, 2016-February 11, 2017 at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

This fall and winter the Mexican Cultural Institute will host the exhibit DELIMITATIONS, which catalogs the work of artists Marcos Ramírez ERRE and David Taylor. The exhibit inauguration will take place Wednesday, September 28 at 6:45 pm and will include a presentation by and discussion with the artists.

DELIMITATIONS catalogs a 2400 mile long, site-specific installation that traces the border between Mexico and the United States as it existed in 1821. In marking the short-lived historic boundary with a series of monuments that mimic those installed along the contemporary border between Mexico and the United States, Ramírez and Taylor question the permanence of borders. Their work acknowledges the territory that Mexico lost and makes a claim for the present, not to contest the current boundary but to prompt a recognition that the United States and Mexico have a shared history and common interests.

See the DELIMITATIONS bloghere

This exhibition is presented in conjunction with the Goethe-Institut's exhibit 2,000 Miles: Divided Land, Common Humanity. You can learn more about their exhibit by clicking here.


2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
September 28, 2016-February 11, 2017
Monday - Friday, 10:00 am - 6:00 pm
Saturdays, 12:00 - 4:00 pm
Free Admission



October 6, 2016 - January 7, 2017 at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

This fall the Mexican Cultural Institute is proud to present the exhibit The Overflow of Productivity Logic, featuring select works of modern and contemporary art from the Coppel Collection.

The Overflow of Productivity Logic, with works by artists Cristina Lucas, Irving Penn, Abraham Cruzvillegas, and more, features a selection of pieces that, through gestures, evocations, or representations, displace the meaning of some of the conceptual pillars of the prevailing economic model. Through three thematic axes, the exhibit calls into question production processes and economic exchange, reflects upon the role that the economy plays in the constitution of an individual, and challenges the logic of "productivity" within the capitalistic economic model.

As part of the exhibition, on October 12 at 6:45pm the Institute will host a lecture by Mireya Escalante, the director of the Coppel Collection. Her talk will explore the exhibit, as well as the history and work of the Collection.

The Coppel Collection was started by Isabel and Agustin Coppel in the 1990s with a selection of Mexican modern art, which they promptly redirected to both national and international contemporary art with an important emphasis on photography. The collection is committed to the research and dissemination of contemporary art, supporting exhibitions, publications, research and art projects.

RSVP to the lecture here


2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
October 6, 2016 - January 7, 2017
Lecture October 12, 6:45pm
Free Admission




November 4-December 18 at the Hillyer Art Space and Mexican Cultural Institute

 

See the work of Mexican photographer Leonor Solís as part of Fotoweek DC 2016. Solís will be featured in the exhibit Challenging Adversity: Ibero-America Copes with Climate Change being shown at the Hillyer Art Space. The exhibit, presented by AACIA, examines how populations of Ibero-American countries have managed to face the vicissitudes caused by climate change through small ventures with more or less technological influence.

More info about Challenging Adversity here

In addition to the work of Leonor Solís, the Mexican Cultural Institute's currents exhibits DELIMITATIONS and The Overflow of Productivity Logic will be included as part of the festival.

Learn about The Overflow of Productivity Logic and DELIMITATIONS as part of Fotoweek DC 2016




Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009

Hillyer Art Space
9 Hillyer Ct NW
Washington, DC 20008



On view now through September 17, 2016 at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

General Motors de Mexico and the Embassy of Mexico in the United States, through its Cultural Institute, are proud to present the exhibit The GM de Mexico Collection of Drawings and Graphic Art.

Through 100 works on paper, the exhibit highlights the evolution of Mexico's artistic narrative during the 20th century and features works by renowned Mexican and foreign-born artists including Diego Rivera, David Alfaro Siqueiros, José Clemente Orozco, Dr. Atl, Elizabeth Catlett, Pablo O'Higgins, Leonora Carrington, Roger Von Gunten and others.

The GM de Mexico Collection of Drawings and Graphic Art was created in the late 1960s and achieves a vast exploration of the rich aspects of 20th century Mexican art. Shown abroad for the first time since 1969, this exhibition is divided into five thematic segments that illuminate the evolution of Mexican art from Muralism to modernity. Through its narrative, the collection offers a unique opportunity to appreciate the global impact of Mexico's artistic contributions.

The exhibit will be on view Monday-Friday from 10:00 am-6:00 pm and Saturdays from 12:00-4:00pm.

See the exhibit catalog here

Images courtesy of General Motors de Mexico


2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
Open now through September 17, 2016
Monday - Friday, 10:00 am - 6:00 pm
Saturdays, 12:00 - 4:00 pm
Free Admission


November 13, 2015 - January 30, 2016 at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

Join the Mexican Cultural Institute for the upcoming exhibit Anamario Hernández: The Force of Fragility.

With a career spanning 40 years, Anamario Hernández, a Mexican resident of Washington DC, is a versatile, self-taught artist with a fine-tuned skill set and an intelligent and delicate aesthetic sensibility. The exhibition Anamario Hernández: The Force of Fragility presents her newest pieces, while simultaneously paying homage to her entire body of work through paintings, etchings, jewelry, sculpture, video, and more.






Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th St NW
Washington DC, 20009
November 13, 2015 - January 30, 2016


October 2 - January 30 at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

The Mexican Cultural Institute is proud to present ...DE PEREGRINA A PEREGRINA..., a photography exhibit created by Mónica Guerrero Mouret that highlights the annual pilgrimage taken by thousands to the Basilica of the Virgin of Guadalupe in Mexico City.

The images tell a story of motivation beyond religious belief; they show a pilgrimage born from tradition that has evolved over hundreds of years and is now an identifying aspect of Mexican Culture.

Mónica Guerrero Mouret is a Mexican artist and photographer whose work focuses on Mexican culture and indigenous expression. She has shown her work all over the world including the Museum of Popular Art and the Museum of Fine Arts in Mexico. She is the author, photographer, and editor of the book ...DE PEREGRINA A PEREGRINA... which follows Mónica on her journey with the pilgrims

2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
October 2 - January 30


June 19 - October 31, 2015 at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

Adventurer, writer, collector, illustrator, architect, designer, entrepreneur and businessman are just a few words that have been used to describe William Spratling, a person who undoubtedly had much to do with Taxco's transformation from small town to center of design.

Granted to the Museo Franz Mayer for a 10-year loan in 2012, this exhibition shows the trajectory of Spratling's vision for design as tool of not only aesthetics, but also one of social transformation.

In four parts covering different themes, silver pieces, including jewelry and documents, seek to show Spratling as a designer committed to his context and his community. Also on display are scores of photographs from the Juan Guzmán Archives (owned by the Televisa Foundation's photographic collections). Exhibited for the first time, the photographs outline the work and personality of one of the pillars of the history of design in Mexico.

If you would like to learn more about the life of William Spratling, click here to download the works used in creating the exhibit.

Photo Credit: Francisco Armando Kochen



2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
June 19 - October 31, 2015
Monday - Friday, 10 am - 6 pm
Saturdays 12 - 4 pm
Free Admission


February 24 - May 30, 2015 at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

"25 years 25 artists" is an exhibition celebrating the Mexican Cultural Institute's first 25 years. This visual arts exhibition presents works from several generations and artistic movements. From the contemporaries of the third stage of Mexican muralism, to the members of the "Ruptura" in the sixties, this exhibit explores art that proposed new forms of expression and changed the way art was seen in Mexico. Featuring work from artists of diverse aesthetics, "25 years 25 artists" presents a collection of pieces produced by both Mexicans and others who were born elsewhere but produced their work in Mexico.

The exhibition will include the works of Manuel Álvarez Bravo, Feliciano Béjar, Arnaldo Coen, José Luis Cuevas, José Chávez Morado, Gunther Gerzso, Ariadne Kimberly, Joy Laville, Gabriel Macotela, Jesús Martínez, Guillermo Meza, Luis Nishizawa, Pablo O'Higgins, Arturo Rivera, Vicente Rojo, Raymundo Sesma, Francisco Toledo and Roger Von Gunten. These pieces are part of the Kimberly Collection.



2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
February 24 - May 30, 2015
Opening February 24, 6:45 pm
Monday - Friday, 10 am - 6 pm
Saturdays 12 - 4 pm
Free Admission


March 5 - 31, 2015 at the Ronald Reagan Building

 

Don't miss Gilberto Aceves Navarro's Bicicletas at the Ronald Reagan Building! Taken from the sculptor's drawing of cyclists in Mexico City, this installation features large steel sculptures that express the character of these vehicles of happiness and health.

Two of these works will be on display at the MCI from March 5th - 31st, with the full exhibition on view at the Ronald Reagan Building. Gilberto Aceves Navarro created the works as a way of paying homage to the bicycle's beautiful form but also as a means of expressing the important relationship between people, cities, and bikes. The works made their debut in Mexico City and made their US premiere in New York last year.





2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
March 5 - 31
Monday - Friday, 10 am - 6 pm
Saturdays 12 - 4 pm
Free Admission


November 12, 2014 - January 31, 2015 at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

"Contemporary Identities/Invisible Gestures" showcases the immense cultural diversity of Iberoamerica through the art of photography. The exhibit, featuring work from artists from 18 countries of Latin America, Portugal and Spain, centers on the relationship between identity and the self in a digital world.

This project is presented in collaboration with the Iberoamerican Cultural Attachés Association (AACIA) and in conjunction with Fotoweek DC.

Participating Embassies: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Paraguay, Peru, Portugal, Spain, Uruguay, and Venezuela

Participating Artists: Alexis Mandujano, Ana Adarve, Ana de Orbegoso, Carlos Cánovas, César Quijada, Esteban García Obando, Fernando Carrera, Ilana Lichtenstein, José Rui Moreira Correia, José Luís Neto, Luis Chay, Mary Rosa Jiménez, Muriel Hasbun, Raúl Cañibano, Ricardo Migliorisi, Ricardo Rivera, Roberto Fernández Ibáñez, Roxana Nagygeller, Susana Carrié, and Yamina del Real



2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
November 12 - January 31, 2015
Opening November 12th, 4:30 - 8 pm
Monday - Friday, 10 am - 6 pm
Saturdays 12 - 4 pm
Free Admission


November 17 - December 1, 2014 at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

"Mexico Through Your Senses" showcases the artistic diversity of the different regions of Mexico. Chiapas - in the south of Mexico - has a vast artistic production and rich traditions that we can see, hear, touch, taste, and appreciate.

"Chiapas: Land Of Woven Colors" invites you to listen to the marimba group Na'rimbo (Monday November 17 at 6:45 pm). A magnificent exhibition of textiles, masks, hats and artistic and artisanal pieces from the various cultural regions of Chiapas will be on display from November 17 to December 1.










2829 16th Street NW DC
Washington, DC 20009
November 17th - December 1st
Free Admission


September 9 - November 3, 2014 at the Mexican Cultural Institute

The Embassy of Mexico and The Televisa Foundation present the exhibition Gabriel Figueroa, Cinematographer. Great Moments in Mexico's Golden Age of Cinema.

 

From the early 1930s through the early 1980s, the Mexican cinematographer Gabriel Figueroa (1907-1997) helped forge an evocative and enduring image of Mexico. Among the most important cinematographers of the so-called Golden Age of Mexican Cinema, Figueroa worked with leading directors from Mexico, the United States and Europe, traversing a wide range of genres while maintaining his distinctive and vivid visual style. In the 1930s, Figueroa was part of a vibrant community of artists in many media, including Diego Rivera, Jose Clemente Orozco, Edward Weston and Manuel Alvarez Bravo, who sought to convey the country's transformation following the trauma of the Mexican Revolution. Later, he adapted his approach to the very different sensibilities of directors Luis Buñuel and John Huston, among others. Figueroa spoke of creating una "imagen mexicana". His films are an essential part of the network of appropriations, exchanges and reinterpretations that formed Mexican visual identity and visual culture in the mid-twentieth century and beyond.

The exhibition features film clips, photographs, posters and documents, many of which are drawn from Figueroa's archive and The Televisa Foundation collections. In addition, the exhibition includes a vast inventory of distinctly Mexican imagery associated with Figueroa's cinematography.

Photo above: Colecciones Fotográficas Fundación Televisa





Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
Free Admission


From July 3 - 31, 2014 at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

Come to the Mexican Cultural Institute for Sandra Pani's scintillating My Intangible Self exhibition, presenting the recent work of celebrated Mexican visual artist Sandra Pani, whose trajectory has been characterized by the exploration of the body, its structure and its relationship with natural phenomena. In addition, it puts into play the viewer's body and sensibility, through the placement of gesture in dialogue with emptiness, and through the diverse textures, transparencies and contrasts generated by the different surfaces employed and the variety of instruments with which the artist inscribes her lines and brushstrokes. Pani's latest explorations employ superimposed veilings that both invite deciphering and impede a definitive reading, opening up a multiplicity of possible interpretations, which construct a continuous dialogue between the identity of the painter and that of her public.

Don't miss Sandra Pani's solo exhibition here, opening July 3rd, 2014!




2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
Opening July 3, 2014
Free Admission

Open M-F 10-6, Sat 12-4
Metro: Columbia Heights


Open from June 10 - July 31, 2014 at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

The Embassy of Mexico, through its Cultural Institute, honors Nobel Laureate Octavio Paz in its latest exhibition, Octavio Paz: De la palabra a la mirada. The exhibit, curated by Miguel Cervantes and Marie Jo Paz, brings together Paz's artist books, capturing Paz's indelible word through the illustration of renowned artists from Mexico and abroad. Rufino Tamayo, Juan Soriano, Vicente Rojo, Marcel Duchamp, Antoni Tàpies, Robert Motherwell, Balthus, and Cy Twombly give greater meaning to the world of Paz's words in this exhibit; don't miss the opportunity to immerse yourself in the artistry of this homage to one of Mexico's greatest writers.









2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
Open from June 10th to July 31st
Free Admission

Open M-F 10-6, Sat 12-4
Metro: Columbia Heights


Diego Rivera: Man at a Crossroads

Open through May 17, 2014 at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

The Embassy of Mexico, through its Cultural Institute, is honored to host an exhibit that reconstructs the history of Diego Rivera's Man at the Crossroads mural, thanks to the Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo Museums and Bank of America Merrill Lynch.

The exposition centers around the mural Rivera painted in New York City, reconstructing its history with reproductions of previously unpublished material, including letters, telegrams, contracts, sketches, and documents, following Rivera's commission, subsequent tension and conflict, and finally, the mural's destruction.

Don't miss this opportunity to relive the complicated polemics of Rivera's mural in New York, in the first US exhibition to fully explore the mural's unique historical trajectory!

Read More

2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
Open through May 17, 2014
Free Admission

Open M-F 10-6, Sat 12-4
Metro: Columbia Heights


Guerrero: Seven Regions of Art and Tradition

Through October 30, 2013 at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

The southwest Mexican state of Guerrero is a richly diverse blend of geography, ethnicity, and culture. Home to four major ethnic groups—Mixtec, Nahua, Tlapanec, and Amuzgo—Guerrero is divided into seven regions with distinctive artistic cultures.

These regions celebrate material and immaterial heritage at once both communal and unique, inherent in their archeological sites, churches, parks, and plazas. From these shared spaces come the crafts, clothing, and artwork that help to underwrite Guerrero's larger cultural identity.

Even between neighboring towns, Guerrero's popular art can vary wildly, from the colorful embroidery of the huipil dress in the Mountain Region to the rich tradition of mask-making present in the Northern Region for over 2,000 years. In a sense, this diversity of art mirrors the diversity of the state, its history, and its peoples.

The Mexican Cultural Institute is proud to collaborate with the Government of Guerrero and its Ministry of Culture to bring Guerrero's most celebrated forms of popular art to the United States. Intricate and elaborate, they serve as tokens of the thriving artisan communities throughout the state that are for many the heart and soul of Guerrero's vibrant culture.

2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
Free Admission

Open M-F 10-6, Sat 12-4
Metro: Columbia Heights


Codex Mexico: The Book as Art

Open until June 29, 2013 at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

On Friday, March 22nd, The Embassy of Mexico's Cultural Institute welcomed the Codex Mexico: The Book as Art exhibition to Washington, DC, in partnership with The Codex Foundation and Stanford University Libraries. The exhibition showcases both Mexico's enormous heritage in the arts of printing, and the Mexicans currently working to renew and enrich such an important legacy. Come explore Codex Mexico, a unique, exciting exposition of artisanal books and printed art at the Mexican Cultural Institute!

Read More

2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
Opening March 22, 6:30pm
Free Admission

Open M-F 10-6, Sat 12-4
Metro: Columbia Heights


Codex Mexico Book Fair and Symposium

April 19 - 20, 2013 at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

Don't miss the Codex Mexico: The Book as Art Exhibition Symposium and Book Fair from April 19th - 20th at the Mexican Cultural Institute. On Friday, April 19th, attendees will have the opportunity to hear short panels such as Tradition and History in Mexican Artist Books and On The Importance of Collecting Artist Books featuring well known printers, artists, and librarians, including founder of the Codex Foundation Peter Koch, Adan Griego and Roberto Trujillo from Stanford University Libraries, and Mexican poet Miguel Angel Pérez Maldonado, among others.

Friday panels will be followed by presentations from five California artists whose work is on display as part of the Mexican Cultural Institute's The Book as Art Exhibition. On Saturday, April 20th, the Mexican Cultural Institute will welcome the Artist Book Fair, where Codex artists and local printers will display pieces from their work.

For a full schedule of Symposium events, click here.

2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
April 19 and 20
Free Admission, RSVP required:

rsvp@instituteofmexicodc.org


Luces y Sombras: Fourteen Travelers in Mexico

November 2012 to February 2013 at the Mexican Cultural Institute

The Embassy of Mexico's Cultural Institute is thrilled to partner with Bank of America to present Luces y Sombras: Fourteen Travelers in Mexico. Open from November 9th through March 2nd, the exhibition finds at its core the twenty hand-pulled photogravures comprising Paul Strand's seminal 1933 Mexican Portfolio. Further explorations of Mexico come from renowned photographers Edward Weston, Wayne Miller, and Aaron Siskind, among others. The collection's diverse array of artists helps capture the sociopolitical realities, local architecture, and startling landscapes of 20th century Mexico through a patently American lens.

The accompanying exhibit Visions of Mexico: The Photography of Hugo Brehme presents 40 works from Hugo Brehme on loan from the Throckmorton Gallery in New York City. A German émigré and popular postcard photographer, Brehme is perhaps best known for his hand-colored vintage photographs, which capture a Mexico as vibrant as it is timeless. Brehme's 20th century Mexico provides thoughtful contrast for La Frontera, a work-in-progress by NYC-based photographer Stefan Falke that chronicles modern-day artists along the US-Mexico border.

Read More




The Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
Gallery Hours: 10-6pm M-F, 12-4pm Sat
Free Admission


Hina/Jaina: On the Threshold of the Mayan Underworld

May 16 - September 22, 2012 At the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

The man-made island of Jaina, off the northern coast of the Yucatan Peninsula in the State of Campeche, was an extremely important Mayan ritual and religious site in the Classic Period (600 - 900 AD). This exhibition presents a selection of over 50 'Jaina style' figurines discovered on the island that depict various aspects of Mayan cosmology, religious beliefs and society, accompanied by a small selection of vessels and objects. Together, they provide fascinating insight into one of Mexico's most intriguing ancient civilizations. Organized in collaboration with Mexico's National Council for Culture and the Arts (CONACULTA), National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) and its regional Campeche Center, this display celebrates the Maya's incredible cultural and artistic legacy in Mexico.
Read More


Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th Street NW DC
10 - 6pm M-F, 12 - 4pm Sat

Free Admission


Mexico: Expected/Unexpected

June 9 - August 12, 2012 At the American University Katzen Arts Center

 

This exhibition of selected works from the Isabel and Agustín Coppel Collection attempts to explore Mexican contemporary art from a point of view that simultaneously underlines the intense dialogue with its canonical history and the international landscape to which it also belongs. No artist is isolated from the global dynamics that fuel the contemporary art of our time. The Isabel and Agustín Coppel Collection includes not only impressive examples by today's leading Mexican artists, but also their peers from Latin America, Europe, and the United States.

From the poetic to the political, Mexico: Expected/Unexpected showcases the key figures of the Mexican contemporary art scene, including Francis Alys, Carlos Amorales, Iñaki Bonillas, Abraham Cruzvillegas, Jorge Méndez Blake, Gabriel Orozco, Damián Ortega, Pedro Reyes, and Melanie Smith. The exhibition contextualizes these artists in relation to noted historical international practitioners, such as Lygia Clark, William Eggleston, Gordon Matta Clark, Ana Mendieta, and Helio Oiticica. Mexico: Expected/Unexpected goes one step further to incorporate the work of cutting-edge international artists working today who share artistic sensibilities and working methods such as Lothar Baumgarten, Maurizio Cattelan, Kendell Geers, Marepe, Rivane Neuenschwander, and Tatiana Trouvé.

Read More


1001 Faces of Mexico

March 1 - May 5, 2012 at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

Masks have been an integral part of the rituals and ceremonies of societies all over the world and this exhibition, curated by folk expert Marta Turok, features over 140 masks accompanied by a selection of photographs, figurines, costumes and musical instruments that reflect the regional traditions, religious rituals and celebrations of the indigenous populations in Mexico from the Ruth D. Lechuga Collection. Together, they provide a salient example of the diversity and richness of Mexican culture.

A prodigious collector of folk art, Dr. Lechuga (1920-2004) travelled around the country for fifty years collecting over 10,000 pieces, including 1,200 masks, which constitute one of the most important Folk Art collections in Mexico. Upon her death, Lechuga donated her collection to the Museo Franz Mayer in Mexico City, and we are pleased to partner with them to exhibit a selection of her masks at the Mexican Cultural Institute.


Vochol: Huichol Art on Wheels

March 21 - May 6, 2012 at the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian

 

The National Museum of the American Indian welcomes the 1990s Volkswagen Beetle named "Vochol", decorated by indigenous craftsmen from the Huichol (Wixaritari) communities of Nayarit and Jalisco, Mexico, using more than 2 million glass beads and fabric. This one-of-a-kind vehicle is presented in collaboration with the Association of Friends of the Museo de Arte Popular and the Museo de Arte Popular in Mexico City, the Embassy of Mexico and the Mexican Cultural Institute.










Frida Kahlo: Her Photographs

February 23 - March 25, 2012 at Artisphere in Arlington, VA

 

Mexican artist Frida Kahlo (1907-1954)'s extraordinary life and iconic biographical paintings have earned her international renown in the world of modern art. Upon Kahlo's death in 1954, more than 6,500 personal photographs and items belonging to her and husband/artist Diego Rivera were sealed and put in storage. For more than half a century this great collection of personal memorabilia remained hidden from the public. In 2007 this collection was opened and Mexican photographer and curator Pablo Ortiz Monasterio inventoried and catalogued 259 images to create the Frida Kahlo: Her Photos exhibition.

These images reveal a little-known side of the artist and lifelong resident of Coyoacán, a Mexico City suburb and Arlington, Virginia's sister city. The collection of photographs in this exhibition reflect Kahlo's tastes and interests, the experiences she shared with those close to her, and her complicated, but also thrilling, personal life. Viewers get an insider's look, not only through who was behind the camera, in front of the lens or the anonymous nature of some of the work but also through the annotated writing found on the back of many of the photographs.

From family pictures and snapshots taken with lovers to images that reveal relationships with Russian Marxist revolutionary Leon Trotsky and American photographers Edward Weston, Alfred Stieglitz, artist Georgia O'Keefe and actress Dolores del Rio, this exhibition provides a glimpse into Kahlo as never seen before.


New York: Latin American and Spanish Artists in the City

February 16 - May 20, 2012 At the OAS Museum

 

Latino superheroes disguised as Spiderman, Green Lantern and Batman will be at AMA showcasing immeasurable life and labor of their day to day lives for the good of others. This, along with works dealing with urbanity, mobility, and migration are set in a city that is the ultimate urban laboratory, where experiences and cultures converge, fostering the exchange of ideas. Included photography, video, drawing, sculpture, and mixed - media work by young, outstanding Latin American and Spanish artists residing in New York City.

The exhibition commemorates artistic exchange and innovative communication channels between visual artists from vboth sides of the pond and opposite hemispheres who share the same language, and the same city.